Tag Archives: research

Putting patient safety first

4 Dec

by Maria Panagioti, Senior Research Fellow

GP & Patient pulse_square

Delivering safe healthcare to patients and preventing patient harm is an international priority. Despite this, patient safety incidents are not uncommon. Around 10 per cent of patients experience a harmful patient safety incident whilst being treated. Such harmful incidents could be due to actions of healthcare professionals, healthcare system failures or a combination of both. Medication errors, misdiagnosis, wrong-site surgery, hospital-acquired infections and in-hospital falls are all examples of serious patient safety incidents which can result in patient harm.

While eliminating patient harm is a desirable goal, in practice it may not always be possible. A certain level of harm is considered inevitable because harm cannot always be predicted. For example, some adverse drug reactions occur in the absence of any error in the medication process and without the possibility of early detection.

Focusing on prevention

This understanding has recently led researchers and policymakers to focus on reducing preventable harm. Although full consensus about the nature of preventable harm has not yet been reached, most working definitions include the idea that preventable harm is identifiable, in that it can be attributed to medical care and modifiable in that it’s possible to avoid by adapting a process or adhering to guidelines. The focus on preventable harm could help policy makers and healthcare practitioners to devise more efficient and reliable plans to predict and prevent patient harm.

There has been a lack of clarity in the literature about the prevalence and main types of preventable harm – and how often severe harm such as death and severe injuries are likely to occur. In response to the need to better understand preventable harm, the General Medical Council commissioned our team to undertake a large systematic review and meta-analysis to understand the nature of preventable patient harm across healthcare settings including hospitals, primary care and specialty settings. The aim of this review is to help the GMC and stakeholders get a better understanding of types, causes and patterns of harm – with a view to identifying ways of mitigating them.

Letting numbers do the talking

We reviewed 149 published studies through this work and our findings in relation to the importance and impact of preventable patient harm were striking:

  • Six in 100 patients experience preventable harm and 13% of this preventable harm leads to permanent disability or patient death.
  • Medication incidents such as errors in ordering, prescribing and administering medication, and misdiagnoses are the main causes of preventable patient harm.
  • Preventable patient harm might also be higher in certain medical specialities such as surgery.

These findings provide useful direction on areas where regulators, the NHS and Government should invest to reduce preventable patient harm. For example, investment in interventions to reduce medication errors (particularly at the stages of prescribing and administration of medication) and preventing misdiagnoses would be encouraged by our findings.

In line with our findings, the importance of improving medication safety is fully recognised by the World Health Organisation who have recently identified Medication Without Harm as the theme for their third Global Safety Challenge. Given the large number of studies we reviewed, the quality and depth of data on preventable patient harm is relatively low. We need to invest in better research and reporting practices to understand which types of patient harm clinicians and healthcare systems can prevent.

In recognition of the importance of patient safety research, and following on from previous research undertaken in Manchester and London already having an impact on NHS frontline services, the NIHR announced funding of three new NIHR PSTRCs. Work began in August at the Centres – located in London, Manchester and Leeds – and their aim is to turn patient safety discoveries into practice.

By understanding the nature of preventable patient harm we can work towards eliminating it – saving lives and reducing unnecessary medical interventions. Investing in reducing key sources of preventable harm and improving reporting standards of future research studies on preventability of patient harm could be a major contribution to the safe care of patients.

The Foundations Framework for Developing and Reporting New Models of Care for Multimorbidity

15 Nov

by Jonathan Stokes, Research Associate in the Manchester Centre for Health Economics

J Stokes_Foundations Framework diagram

With colleagues at the Universities of Bristol, Glasgow and Dundee, we have published a framework aimed at improving care for patients with multimorbidity (two or more long-term conditions).

Long-term conditions and multimorbidity are a global health priority. Patients with multimorbidity receive more fragmented care and have worse health outcomes, and health systems struggle to address their needs. We need new ways of delivering care to address this.

To date, there has been limited success at delivering care that improves outcomes for these patients. One major problem is that there is no agreement on how to describe care for patients with multimorbidity. This makes it difficult for researchers to talk about their work, and to explain these new ways of delivering care to patients and policy makers. Our framework offers a starting point for addressing this issue.

Our framework describes care for multimorbidity in terms of the foundations:

  •  the theory on which it is based
  • ·         the target population (‘multimorbidity’ is a vague term, so we need to define the group carefully, e.g. a patient with diabetes and hypertension might have very different care needs than a patient with dementia and depression)
  • the elements of care implemented to deliver the model.

We categorised 3 elements of care: (1) the clinical focus (e.g. a focus on mental health), (2) how care was organised (e.g. offering extended appointment times for those who have multimorbidity), and (3) what was needed to support care (e.g. changing the IT system to better share electronic records between primary and secondary care).

We used our framework to look at current approaches to care for multimorbid patients. We found:

  • Care for multimorbidity is mostly based on the well-known Chronic Care Model (CCM). This was designed for people with single diseases, and may not be fit for purpose for patients with multimorbidity.
  • Much care is focussed on elderly or high-risk patients, although there are actually more people aged under 65 with multimorbidity. We need to make sure that models don’t neglect the needs of younger patients, or those who are at lower risk, who might have most to gain in preventing future health problems.
  • We need to look more at the needs of low-income populations (where multimorbidity is known to be more common), and those with mental health problems (multimorbid patients with a mental health issue are at increased risk for worse health outcomes).
  • There is an emphasis on self-management, but patients with multimorbidity frequently have barriers to self-managing their diseases.
  • The emphasis on case management (intensive individual management of high-risk patients) should take into account the evidence that while patient satisfaction can be improved, cost and self-assessed health are not significantly affected.

Health systems have only recently begun to implement new models of care for multimorbidity, with limited evidence of success. Careful design and reporting can help develop evidence more rapidly in this important area. We hope our framework can encourage better research which is urgently needed to improve care for those who use it most.

This free to read article can be found at the following link: http://www.annfammed.org/content/15/6/570.full

Stokes J, Man M-S, Guthrie B, Mercer SW, Salisbury C, Bower P. The Foundations Framework for Developing and Reporting New Models of Care for Multimorbidity. The Annals of Family Medicine. 2017;15(6):570-7.

Learning from each other: the International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) Conference 2017

24 Oct

by Rebecca Morris, Research Fellow in the Safety in Marginalised Groups theme

ISQua 1_CROPPED_Becci Morris

The International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) conference was held this year at the QEII conference centre in London next to Westminster Abbey and Palace of Westminster which was a prestigious backdrop to an interesting and diverse range of presentations.  This year’s conference focused on learning at the system level to improve healthcare quality and safety and was supported by the Health Foundation. It was great to see that the conference was awarded the Patients Included status which reflected the conference’s focus on incorporating the experience of patients whilst ensuring that they are not excluded or exploited. This was evident within presentations that I attended that included patients speaking alongside researchers and clinicians and I felt this was a welcome development from last year’s conference. Sharing and valuing different experiences and expertise is an important recognition of different types of expertise that need to be involved, particularly when we are looking at healthcare quality and safety.

There was a fantastic array of workshops, plenaries, oral and poster presentations. I wanted to be in more of the streams than I could attend in one day! I had both a 15 minute oral presentation and a poster presentation to discuss two of the projects in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC. My oral presentation was part of the Quality in the community theme and it was great to hear about different community approaches to quality and safety across the world. I presented the James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership and the top 10 priorities for future research. This is important in shaping the direction of future work which prioritises the questions which patients, carers and healthcare professionals need answering. Also in-keeping with the theme of incorporating the experience of patients and turning that into action, I presented a poster on the co-development of the patient safety guide for primary care where we have co-produced the guide package with patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists. The poster was a great opportunity to discuss the patient safety guide, co-production and networking with people from a range of places, from Canada to India, about the work and sharing ideas and building links.

After last year’s conference where there was a limited discussion of primary care and the community, it was great that there were so many of us there to represent the work that we’ve been doing working with patients, carers and clinicians. Fellow Greater Manchester PSTRC researchers, Caroline Sanders and Sudeh-Cheraghi Sohi, were part of workshops discussing the use of patient experience data and diagnostic safety respectively, along with posters from Penny Lewis and Christian Thomas exploring safety in community pharmacy.

To finish off an interesting day I was invited to a Health Foundation reception at Westminster Abbey to carry on the conversations and it was great to meet and discuss how our work can lead to improvement in the system and experiences of people who use and deliver healthcare services. A great way to end the day and I’m looking forward to how we can build on this over the next year.

Placing ALL patients and carers at the heart of patient safety research: introducing our new theme on marginalised groups

23 Aug

by Caroline Sanders, Research Lead in Safety in Marginalised Groups: Patients and Carers

Inclusion_raised-hands_small_AdobeStock_69187814

In his 2013 review for improving patient safety, Don Berwick emphasised the importance of seeking out the voice of patients and carers, and ensuring they are ‘present, powerful and involved’ at all levels. This has been a major focus of our earlier research, our involvement and engagement work, and led to our priority setting partnership in conjunction with the James Lind Alliance in March 2017. This identified the number 1 question for future research is to understand ‘How can patient safety be assured for the most vulnerable in society?’. This recognises the widespread concerns and evidence showing that patients and carers who are already disadvantaged and marginalised, may also be at greater risk of harm within the healthcare system.  Additionally, we have not yet done enough to ensure we hear the voices and understand the experiences of marginalised groups to be able to develop appropriate and effective interventions to support patient safety for ALL patients and carers.

Our starting point for the new research that will evolve along with our further Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) work, is to acknowledge that people may be disadvantaged and marginalised by multiple factors such age, disability, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and socio-economic disadvantage.  For example, we know that BME groups have poorer health outcomes, and poorer access and experiences of healthcare services. People may also be marginalised because of stigma and poor access to services for specific conditions (e.g. mental health problems); or they may be marginalised because of the circumstances or settings in which they live (e.g. living alone, caring for someone at home, living in a rural setting, in a care home or prison, being homeless).

In this theme, we will be working closely with other themes and our PPI contributors to focus on and understand safety risks and concerns for specific population and patient groups. For example, what are the particular challenges in relation to communication, which we know is considered by patients and carers to be a crucial foundation for safe care? What are the challenges for marginalised groups of patients in the ever-changing care context, where there are new responsibilities and health care practices expected as a part of enabling better self-management? We will co-design or adapt tools to support patient safety that will be tailored for such groups.  This may include use of mobile apps or other technologies, and we will also focus on the help and support that people might need to make sure they can use these, or enable appropriate alternatives. We know this means we need to be creative in reaching out to communities and groups who currently feel disempowered or hidden in relation to healthcare research and service provision. We are looking forward to this exciting opportunity to seek out some of the quietest and most hidden voices to ensure the most vulnerable can have better and safer care.

Please see our webpage or contact us for further information or to share any comments and suggestions.

Patient Safety: the way forward

8 Aug

by Stephen Campbell, Director of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC

University campus

Seventy five percent of patient safety research is focused on hospitals. Less is known about patient safety outside hospitals, yet 85% of NHS contacts happen in these settings, mostly in general practice and in pharmacies. The scale of primary care in England is huge. There are 340 million general practice consultations annually, with 2% involving a patient safety incident, which means 6.8 million times each year where a patient is potentially at risk of harm. There are one billion prescriptions issued per year outside of hospitals, with 4.9% having an error – 49 million every year. And 20% of patients discharged from hospital will report an adverse event, which could lead to costly readmission to hospital. On 1 August 2012, the Greater Manchester Primary Care Patient Safety Translational Research Centre (Greater Manchester PSTRC) started, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).  Our PSTRC has been a groundbreaking centre as it was the first patient safety centre to focus on primary care (general practice, community pharmacies etc.) as well as the interfaces with hospital care. The focus on primary care was intentional and needed.

We have achieved many improvements in primary care safety over the last 5 years. For example, we have developed a “Safer Prescribing” e-learning course for GPs, which has reduced prescribing errors.  We have developed a Medication Safety Dashboard as a “missed opportunity detector” that has resulted in fewer patients being at risk of potentially hazardous prescribing. We have used mobile technology such as smartphone apps to deliver safer healthcare. As an example, ClinTouch monitors symptom change in people with serious mental illness. We have worked in partnership with patients, GPs and pharmacists to create a Patient Safety Guide for general practice.

I am a health services researcher who has focused on the quality and safety of primary care for 25 years. Over that time there have been many advances in improving quality and safety but equally people are living longer, often with several health conditions requiring care from many different sources, in a world that becomes ever more complex with new digital technologies and “intelligent healthcare communities”. Most research and advances in patient safety are typically found within single care settings, such as the emergency department. Less attention has been paid to safety between (transitional) community providers and hospital care settings. Delayed diagnosis, incomplete patient information and medication errors are examples of problems, which may occur both within settings and across an interface. That is why we shall focus on primary care but also on transitional care settings in our second period of 5-years of funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), which started on 1 August 2017.

Over the next 5 years, our research will focus on:

  • Safety Informatics – developing technologies and behaviours that create safer care systems and to prevent diagnostic errors – working with the Health e-Research Centre
  • Medication Safety –developing safety management systems to ensure safer prescribing and treatment and to prevent medication errors
  • Safer Care Systems and Transitions – a new theme, to make care safer for patients moving between care settings
  • Safety in Marginalised Groups – a new theme – to enable patients and carers to take control of their care. There will be a key focus on patients and carers as well as mental health, working with the Centre for Mental Health and Safety

Service responsibility and patient responsibility for patient safety go hand-in-hand. They are equal. A member of the public seeking healthcare as a patient for themselves or a loved-one deserves the safest and best quality care possible. That is the duty of healthcare providers and professionals. Avoiding errors, or identifying and correcting them, is a high priority. Equally, patients can do much to keep themselves safer in terms of accessing care appropriately, taking medications as prescribed, self-managing a healthy lifestyle with sensible eating and drinking as well as exercising etc. This is the responsibility of each member of the public. It is a shared responsibility that requires co-design and partnership working, which underpins everything we do.

A key aspect of our work, and something which I think is crucial to the PSTRC, is capacity building and training people to be able to conduct and apply research. This includes recruiting PhD students, helping a group of pharmacists to work together on research projects in their own pharmacies, and training researchers as well as members of the public and patients. Healthcare isn’t just about a medical procedure or treatment option, it is about people, both those who deliver the care and those who receive it or work in partnership together. The PSTRC aims to be an interactive research centre working with healthcare professionals, the NHS, local authorities, industry and patients, carers and members of the public to make healthcare safer.

Much is happening in Greater Manchester that gives us opportunities to make a real difference. We will work across Greater Manchester’s newly-integrated Health and Social Care Partnership which serves 3 million people. The Connected Health Cities programme across the north of England will help us get our research implemented. We will continue to work in partnership with colleagues at the University of Nottingham, especially in the research on safer transitions and medication safety. We look forward to new collaborations with colleagues at the Christie NHS Foundation Trust and Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust. There is much we can do using new digital technologies and behavioural interventions to improve safety and healthcare for the benefit of patients.

I want to thank everyone who has been involved with the PSTRC over the last 5 years. I look forward to working with everyone in the new PSTRC to continue our exciting, innovative and important research. The PSTRC has many outstanding and world-leading researchers and an excellent core staff. There is much to do but we will continue to build the capacity to make care safer.

The PSTRC has a strong involvement and engagement agenda working alongside members of the public and patients as well as healthcare professionals. If you would like to find out more about our research and how you can get involved then please email Zarina Saeed at zarina.saeed@manchester.ac.uk .

 

Why does PPI benefit research?

13 Jul

by Sally Giles, Research Fellow in Core PPI Research theme and Philip Hammond, PPI Coordinator

PPI blog post_July2017

Why do PPI?

“All organisations should seek out the patient and carer voice as an essential asset in monitoring the safety + quality of care” Berwick Review, July 2013

We believe that including the patient voice in our research makes it more meaningful and relevant to the real world.  We have experienced examples of when patient feedback has influenced our research.  As part of the Greater Manchester PSTRC we wanted to look at how PPI impacted on our research in an academic context.  To do this we had a look at the academic literature, firstly to find out why people involve members of the public in their research. We discovered that people who use health services can help to ensure that issues that are identified and prioritised are important to them and therefore to health care, public health and social care as a whole.  Public involvement can help to ensure that money and resources are not wasted on research that has little or no relevance and that being involved in research can help empower people living with a medical condition.  We used this as a basis to develop our own PPI structure within the Greater Manchester PSTRC.

The Research User Group (RUG)

The RUG started off as a group of 12 members of the public, who met every 6 weeks.  Each of the research themes within the Greater Manchester PSTRC were allocated 2 or 3 members to their theme.  A RUG evaluation highlighted that some researchers were heavily reliant on their aligned members for all projects within their theme.  It also highlighted that it was challenging to see how the RUG was having an impact on research, as this impact was mainly happening at project level.   Based on feedback of RUG members and in an attempt to widen involvement by bringing in more associate members of the public, a restructure to the RUG took place.  It was agreed that there should be a split between governance and project level PPI.  This new structure was implemented two years into the centre.

The restructure enabled us to focus more on project level PPI, and we have a number of examples of how PPI has benefitted the research on specific projects.  Some examples follow below:

1.   Multimorbidity Research Advisory Group (MRAG) was set up to involve patients and carers in the development of resources and new research projects for the Multimorbidity theme.  It consisted of 18 group members who provided feedback on research, shared ideas, helped to set research priorities and supported two applications for further funding.

2.   In the Interface & Informatics theme patients and public contributors have been involved in enhancing research by taking part in a number of  sessions aimed at investigating the relevance of an established patient portal for patients with long term conditions (PatientView) and identifying strategies for improvement. This group also commented on draft study protocols, designed and co-facilitated a larger workshop and helped to identify social media and patient associations as an additional recruitment strategy (resulting in 25% more recruits).

3.      In the Medication Safety theme members of the public have been involved in the recruitment of participants for focus groups, co-facilitation of focus groups and coding of transcripts using an existing framework.

4.      For the Core theme members of the public have helped develop the Primary Care Patient Measure of Safety (PC_PMOS) study.  They helped to develop the items to be included in the PC_PMOS and recruited patients in GP practices to complete the PC_PMOS, Patients were able to relate more easily to the PPI members than the research team, which helped to increase participation in the study

5.      In the GP theme there has been public and stakeholder involvement in the patient safety guide project via 3 different involvement groups with key stakeholders.

Thoughts for the future

Our advice to anyone wanting to develop a PPI structure within a large (or small) research centre is to plan carefully by starting with a clear strategy, but be willing to accept that this will constantly change as the needs of those involved evolve.  Involvement needs to continue to be an iterative process, people have different (and changing) needs and get involved for different reasons, and equally research studies have different aims and priorities which need to be addressed when planning involvement.  We see involvement as being broader than patients or members of the public.  Often the end users of our research have been health professionals and as such, our definitions of involvement and engagement have evolved to include all relevant stakeholders.

Introducing…Safety in Marginalised Groups: Mental Health

5 Jul

by Nav Kapur and Roger Webb

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Safety in mental health services:  reducing suicide and self-harm

Nav Kapur, Research Lead, says:

‘It’s fantastic to be involved in the new NIHR Patient Safety Translational Research Centre.  It is particularly exciting that safety in mental health services will be a prominent part of the new work.  We are really looking forward to getting started.  We will be making new appointments (both Research Associates and funded PhD students) in order to make this a world-beating research programme.  The focus on both suicide and self-harm is really pertinent given the current policy and health priority on these very important outcomes.  So over the summer and autumn we will get going on the actual research using a variety of methods.  Personally I can’t wait to start working with the internationally-leading team of researchers, academics and clinicians across the PSTRC’.

Roger Webb, key project lead, says:

‘I’m enthused by this wonderful new initiative, which enables our Centre for Mental Health and Safety to join forces in working collaboratively with a much larger group of internationally renowned experts in the patient safety field. Our planned work programme, focussing on self-harm and suicide, encompasses a number of ground-breaking studies.

These studies include:

  • evaluating how changes to health service provision may impact on national suicide  rates
  • developing and testing psychological treatments following self-harm
  • investigating key transitions from institutional care to living back in the community, among discharged patients and released prisoners with enduring mental health problems
  • assessing clinical management of common mental health problems across healthcare sectors, and subsequent risks of self-harm, suicide and other causes of premature death.’