Tag Archives: research

Black and minority ethnic involvement in health research: Veena Parmar

20 Jun

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Veena Parmar has been providing a patient/public perspective for NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC student Shoba Dawson’s PhD project about barriers to involvement in research among BME (black and minority ethnic) groups.  In this article she chats to Jill Stocks (Research Fellow, Core theme) about her experience.

Jill: Hi Veena, tell me a little about your background.

Veena: I am a second generation Indian born in Nairobi and educated in the British colonial system. My family is a blend of Anglo Indian Portuguese culture. It’s great when we have family gatherings to exchange our various views. The Portuguese family go on about Vasco da Gama, Christopher Columbus, Cork, port wine and the spice trade while we Anglo Indians brag about the industrial revolution, trains, the cotton and motor industry, and so on. Since being married I have lived in and around Manchester.

Jill: Before becoming involved with the Greater Manchester PSTRC what did you know about Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) in research?

Veena: I had only heard about people who were participating in clinical trials, I had some friends who were part of a rheumatism trial.

Jill: What made you decide to become involved in PPI?

Veena: At first I was dubious but Shoba really encouraged me to come and meet her and the other PPI partner. At the meeting I found the topic really interesting, we read some case studies and gave our opinions.

Jill: What have you personally got out of the involvement?

Veena: I learnt a lot and found myself reflecting on my own multicultural experience through our discussions. Shoba is a kind person and always very supportive.

Jill: What support or advice were you able to provide?

Veena: I offered advice on how to get BME communities involved in research. I had lots of ideas and suggestions about how to work through community leaders and how to approach women in socially-conservative communities.

Jill: What aspects did you enjoy least or find difficult?

Veena: I was asked to give a presentation and imagined it would be in a theatre with a large audience so I felt unable to do it. In fact it was an informal talk with a small audience so I felt a bit disappointed because I would have felt confident to talk if I had known that.

Jill: What advice would you give to anybody thinking about getting involved as a PPI partner?

Veena: Make sure you understand what you are getting yourself in to and ask questions. Keep an open mind and you will learn a lot.

Jill: Would you do more PPI in future?

Veena: Yes – absolutely.  Although I am about to retire and hope to do some travelling so it would have to be as a short term commitment…

NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Meet the Team – Sally Giles

12 May

The seventh in our NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC ‘Meet the Team’ series introduces Sally Giles, Research Fellow in our Core PPI research theme

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Greater Manchester PSTRC Dissemination Event: A Lay Delegate’s Perspective

28 Mar

by Moira Lyons, member of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Research User Group (RUG)

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As a Core Member of the Greater Manchester Primary Care Patient Safety Translational Research Centre (GM PSTRC)’s Research User Group (RUG), I was delighted to be invited to attend the Centre’s recent flagship dissemination event, “Safer Primary Care: A shared responsibility for system-wide learning”, which was held over two days at the Manchester Conference Centre. For me, the inclusion of members of the public in the delegate list (and not purely as spectators – several RUG members took part in the delivery of workshops, alongside researchers) underlined the genuine commitment to patient and public involvement apparent in every aspect of the Centre’s work.

It was very exciting to see the evidence of how much had been achieved over the last five years and to hear something of the plans for the new PSTRC! The atmosphere was one of expectation and enthusiasm and an inextinguishable optimism for the future. One theme resonated throughout – communication and sharing data. The more we can make use of the data available to us and share the information we have with all parties involved, the better it will be for everybody and the easier it will be to progress all aspects of patient safety. And what better exemplification of that than this event!

The speakers were relevant, informative and entertaining, the organisation was faultlessly streamlined – even the catering was of a high standard, plentiful and varied. A balance was struck between opportunities to listen and learn and opportunities to discuss and ask questions. The poster session was a lively event, as presenters eagerly approached delegates who showed an interest in their work. The diversity of research within a common theme was impressive, as was the dynamic exchange of information that drew everybody in. For example, I had a very interesting discussion with two GPs about the differences in diagnosing practice between the UK and other parts of the European community; a Dutch GP will routinely consider the option of whether or not there is “a need to treat” – a relevant concept in view of the current concern about overprescribing. It was also good to hear a GP decry the use of the “one appointment one issue” policy that has been adopted in some general practices.

The Event Dinner at the Principal Hotel, on the evening of the first day, was well attended. The after-dinner speech, delivered by Professor Richard Roberts, was a highlight. Even though, as he pointed out, he was all that stood between diners and dessert, his audience was captivated by a superb combination of thought provoking comment and insightful reflection, informed by personal experience, as he considered the future of primary care.

The two days passed all too quickly.

What are patient and clinician priorities for research in primary care patient safety?

9 Dec

by Rebecca Morris, Research Fellow in General Practice theme

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Over the last few months I have been working on the James Lind Alliance (JLA) Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) (to find out more about the JLA read Richard Morley’s blog ‘Welcome to the Revolution’). The aim of our PSP is to ask ‘what are the questions that patients and clinicians have about primary care patient safety?’ The final aim is to produce a list of the 10 top uncertainties (or questions) that need to be addressed by research.

What have we been doing? Anyone could submit their question about primary care patient safety to our survey which was open from June to mid-July for 6 weeks. We advertised the survey in many places with the support of our steering group, their networks, and other organisations to reach as many people as possible and we had a total of 443 questions submitted.  Thank you to everyone who took part! 

The next stage in the JLA process involved working through the list to categorise the questions into different categories and by the areas of primary care (eg pharmacy, general practice, dentistry, out of hours care, self-management or broader primary care questions).  Then we worked through the list of questions to combine duplicate or similar questions. This produced a list of 173 possible uncertainties.

What are we doing at the moment? We are currently searching the literature to see if these questions have been answered using the JLA criteria for a ‘certainty’. We have been working with Central Manchester Foundation Trust libraries that have been searching the literature and we have been reviewing the searches to see if any of these questions have been answered. Any questions not answered already will then form a list of ‘uncertainties’. There has been a great range of questions posed which has made very interesting to look through such a diverse spread of topics. The next stage is to work with our PSP to initial prioritise the list of uncertainties and then in January we will have another survey which will open to everyone to help us identify the top 30 uncertainties to take to the final workshop in March, 2017.

What’s next and how can you get involved? Thank you to everyone who has taken part so far or worked with us to identify the literature. It’s a fascinating project with lots of great questions being posed and shows how many important areas there are for primary care patient safety research. Now I want to pass it back to you to help us prioritise the key areas for primary care patient safety research from these questions so please keep your eye out for the next survey in January, 2017. Thanks!

To keep up to date with what is happening and find out when the next survey is open follow @JLA_PtSafetyPSP

Patient Safety in Dentistry

29 Jul

By Barry Kinshuck, Dental Adviser representing the British Dental Association

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My name is Barry Kinshuck and I have been asked to represent dentistry by the British Dental Association in the excellent project to be undertaken by the James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership.

As a dental practitioner in Wigan for nearly 40 years and a dental adviser in Wigan and now Greater Manchester I have seen continuous changes and improvements in patient safety in dentistry.

The dental profession is committed to providing safe dental care, which is necessary for ensuring good general health, and aims to minimise risks and establish an open culture of patient safety, in which practitioners can learn from their own and others’ experience.

Duty of Care

Responsibilities for health and safety are set out in the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (the Act) and associated regulations. The Act seeks to protect all those at work – employers, employees and the self-employed, as well as members of the public who may be affected by the work activities of these people.

Care Quality Commission inspects dental practices and wants to see evidence that a dental practice is:

  1. Safe
  2. Effective
  3. Caring
  4. Responsive to patients’ needs
  5. Well led

Safety is top of the list and dental practices should be able to demonstrate how they:

  • Manage risk
  • Prevent infection
  • Provide suitable premises and equipment
  • Manage  and maintain equipment
  • Manage medical devices
  • How lessons are learnt and improvements are made when something goes wrong
  • What systems, processes and practices are in place to keep people safe and safeguard them from abuse?

The General Dental Council

This is the organisation that regulates dental professionals and in their document Standards for the dental team makes several statements of relevance with respect to patient safety:

  • Principle one (put patient’s interests first) states in standard 1.5.4 ‘You must record all patient safety incidents and report them promptly to the appropriate national body’.
  • Principle eight (raise concerns of patients at risk) states in standard 8.1 ‘You must always put patients’ safety first’.

The James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership provides an opportunity for the British Dental Association to understand what areas of patient safety matter most to patients and healthcare professionals.