Tag Archives: pharmacy collaborative

NHS 70: celebrating pharmacy and looking to the future

2 Aug
NHS 70 Pharmacy event group photo_small

Members and organisers of the Pharmacy Collaborative l-r: James Hind, Edward Teggart, Melinda Lyons, Lauren Worrall

by Lauren Worrall and Melinda Lyons

This year, to celebrate 70 years of the NHS, the Local Professional Network for Pharmacy in Greater Manchester held a conference to recognise how pharmacy professionals had contributed to the NHS and looking forward to how pharmacists expect their role to change to serve the needs of the NHS in the future. The conference involved exploring current issues impacting on pharmacy practice. As part of this, the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative gave a workshop in Manchester on their continuing research into improving patient safety.

Co-chaired by Lauren Worrall and Melinda Lyons from the PSTRC, previous translational research was presented demonstrating how some techniques used in high hazard industries could be applied to pharmacy practice.  These included looking at errors, as well as trying to manage distractions and interruptions. There was also insight from the pharmacy collaborative members on how involvement in the research has influenced their practice and provided them with new approaches to improve patient safety in their pharmacy teams.  Collaborative member Edward Teggart presented his approach to managing error risk in practice and James Hind presented his award winning work on managing distractions.

To get the audience of pharmacists really engaged and learn about risk management decision making, the delegates took part in a team game where their risk management decisions could result in them maintaining lucrative service contracts or going bankrupt in the blink of an eye!

The workshop concluded with a question and answer session which led to a lively discussion about safety in practice. The delegates shared the issues that impact upon their work on a day-to-day basis.  In the relatively unexplored area of risk management research in community pharmacy, questions were posed about the potential avenues and future direction of their research. Whilst everyone agreed that patient safety is critical to their practice, there was also agreement that it is often difficult to share good ideas and learning. The concept of the community pharmacy collaborative was something that all agreed enhanced patient safety and could be used in other geographical areas.

Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative part two: Assessing safety

31 Aug

by Sarah Wood, Member of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative

Sarah Wood_Pharmacy Collaborative post_CROPPED_Aug16

I heard about the community pharmacy patient safety collaborative about 6 months ago through an advertisement by Community Pharmacy Greater Manchester. As a community pharmacy operations manager with some previous research experience, I have a keen interest in assessing and improving the safety of the many processes in community pharmacy and learning from other industries and experts to do so. As such, I wrote to Dr Penny Lewis to see how I could get involved.  Since then I have been attending monthly training sessions at the University and trying out my new skills back at the pharmacy I work in.

One particular risk to safety that I am interested in are interruptions, such as the phone ringing or customers waiting at the counter. These interruptions are a common occurrence in community pharmacies and can lead to problems when they disturb pharmacy staff who need to focus on the task dispensing medicines accurately. As a result of my involvement in the collaborative, I have produced a safety case on interruptions in the dispensing process in one of my pharmacies and have also identified potential areas for future safety cases. The process of gathering the data, observing the pharmacy, consulting on safety issues with my colleagues and writing up the safety case has made me view company safety mechanisms completely differently. An example of this is how we record errors in community pharmacy: it’s easy to get caught up in how many errors are reported and why they are happening (obviously very important) but we don’t always look at what is best for our staff and which recording mechanisms are easier for them to use on a day to day basis – this is something I will be looking at in future.

The collaboration is also taking on more community pharmacy professionals and, as such, one of my colleagues, an accuracy checking technician, will be joining me in the production of the next safety case. This will be even more beneficial for our company as we can produce and compare safety across different branches.

In the next stage of the collaborative I aim to put together a business case for improving safety. There are obvious, clinical reasons for improving safety in community pharmacy but not much is known about the impact a lack of safety has on our business e.g. loss of customer confidence and possibly loss of custom. This is something I think the wider profession will be interested in and may encourage businesses to be even more proactive when addressing safety issues.

Read part one of the blog series.

Read part three of the blog series.