Tag Archives: ISQua

ISQua 34th annual conference

1 Feb

ISQua 1_CROPPED_Becci Morris

In October 2017, Sudeh Cheraghi-Sohi chaired a workshop at The International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua) 34th annual conference. The workshop was entitled “Developing and improving a systems approach to diagnostic safety in primary care” and was developed with collaborators Hardeep Singh from the Veterans Affairs organisation based in Houston, Texas and Ian Litchfield from the Institute of Applied Health Research, Birmingham University.

The workshop covered three major areas in diagnostic error and safety.  Firstly, Sudeh introduced the concept and various definitions of diagnostic error, along with the various causes of such errors and how to measure them. This was followed by Ian Litchfield presenting some work on a specific cause of diagnostic errors: poor or non-existent test results follow-up. Ian Litchfield described where these issues commonly occur e.g. clinicians being unaware that ordered tests had not come back from the lab. Finally, Hardeep Singh summarised the future research agenda in this area and highlighted how Information Technology will play an increasing role in diagnostic safety.

Many in the audience expressed surprise as to how little focus there had been on this area given its importance and expressed support of our current work and the future research agenda. Diagnostic error is still a niche area, but is gaining prominence due to America’s Institute of Medicine’s 2015 Improving Diagnosis report and The World Health Organization’s Technical Series on Safer Primary Care, which both prioritised errors in diagnosis as a global priority for patient safety.

Learning from each other: the International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) Conference 2017

24 Oct

by Rebecca Morris, Research Fellow in the Safety in Marginalised Groups theme

ISQua 1_CROPPED_Becci Morris

The International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) conference was held this year at the QEII conference centre in London next to Westminster Abbey and Palace of Westminster which was a prestigious backdrop to an interesting and diverse range of presentations.  This year’s conference focused on learning at the system level to improve healthcare quality and safety and was supported by the Health Foundation. It was great to see that the conference was awarded the Patients Included status which reflected the conference’s focus on incorporating the experience of patients whilst ensuring that they are not excluded or exploited. This was evident within presentations that I attended that included patients speaking alongside researchers and clinicians and I felt this was a welcome development from last year’s conference. Sharing and valuing different experiences and expertise is an important recognition of different types of expertise that need to be involved, particularly when we are looking at healthcare quality and safety.

There was a fantastic array of workshops, plenaries, oral and poster presentations. I wanted to be in more of the streams than I could attend in one day! I had both a 15 minute oral presentation and a poster presentation to discuss two of the projects in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC. My oral presentation was part of the Quality in the community theme and it was great to hear about different community approaches to quality and safety across the world. I presented the James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership and the top 10 priorities for future research. This is important in shaping the direction of future work which prioritises the questions which patients, carers and healthcare professionals need answering. Also in-keeping with the theme of incorporating the experience of patients and turning that into action, I presented a poster on the co-development of the patient safety guide for primary care where we have co-produced the guide package with patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists. The poster was a great opportunity to discuss the patient safety guide, co-production and networking with people from a range of places, from Canada to India, about the work and sharing ideas and building links.

After last year’s conference where there was a limited discussion of primary care and the community, it was great that there were so many of us there to represent the work that we’ve been doing working with patients, carers and clinicians. Fellow Greater Manchester PSTRC researchers, Caroline Sanders and Sudeh-Cheraghi Sohi, were part of workshops discussing the use of patient experience data and diagnostic safety respectively, along with posters from Penny Lewis and Christian Thomas exploring safety in community pharmacy.

To finish off an interesting day I was invited to a Health Foundation reception at Westminster Abbey to carry on the conversations and it was great to meet and discuss how our work can lead to improvement in the system and experiences of people who use and deliver healthcare services. A great way to end the day and I’m looking forward to how we can build on this over the next year.