Tag Archives: Involvement

How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

2 Aug

This edition’s reflection comes from Kay Gallacher, a member of the public who is involved in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Patient Safety Guide.

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Why did you become involved in the Patient Safety Guide project?

I have long been aware of the issues that elderly family and neighbours, in particular have experienced trying to manage contact with their GPs and pharmacies.  The brilliant, simple idea behind this Patient Safety Guide seems to address many of the concerns in a practical and tangible way.  I was also attracted by the fact that this was a collaborative project where patients, carers and medical professionals all have an equally important input into the design and delivery of both the paper- based Guide and the mobile app, hopefully making it a 360 degrees (all round) useful tool.

How do you think the Greater Manchester PSTRC benefitted from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

I guess it’s for others to judge what impact, if any, I’ve had on the project.  However, I’ve brought a genuine understanding of the problems patients face when coming into contact with primary care and producing leaflets and guides was bread and butter for me in my marketing career.  So, I hope I’ve been helpful in producing and delivering an effective product.

How do you feel that you benefitted from your involvement?

I am involved with several projects, but this one in particular has sharpened my understanding of how the GP/ patient dynamic operates.  I came to this project with a patient’s viewpoint but I now have a better insight into the challenges GPs face in establishing and maintaining effective communication with patients.  Also, the deep personal satisfaction of feeling that I’ve made a positive contribution.  Importantly, I can’t overstate the pleasure I’ve derived from being part of a cohesive, effective and well-led team composed of great people from a wide range of backgrounds.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other patients and carers? If so, why?

Definitely!!  What you get from being involved largely depends on what you put into it but I can absolutely guarantee that, regardless of your starting point, you will have a better understanding of the workings of medical research and the wider world of medicine in general.

How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

3 May

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This edition’s reflection comes from Lauren Worrall, a pharmacist who is involved in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative.

Lauren, why did you become involved in the Greater Manchester Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative?

My motivation to join the collaborative was to receive training on different skills and techniques to improve patient safety within my own practice area.  Furthermore I wanted to explore the world of research within pharmacy.

How do you think the Greater Manchester PSTRC benefitted from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

As a group we devise potential ways to improve practice and develop various interventions.  As an individual I can then go out and test the efficacy of the interventions in pharmacy practice settings. My experience in community pharmacy allows me to positively contribute to the work of the collaborative.

Personally and professionally, how do you feel you benefitted from your involvement?

Getting involved with the group has allowed me to work with other pharmacists and safety experts to reflect upon and improve my own practice. It has also afforded me a better knowledge of what is involved in research.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other healthcare professionals? If so, why?

Participating in research allows you to be creative and explore innovative methods in whichever healthcare setting you are working in. If you are interested in improving your practice and that of others then I would highly recommend getting involved.

A New Approach to Governance – Non-Executive Lay Members on the Greater Manchester PSTRC Executive Management Board

17 Jan

by Dave Edwards

  • Lay Non-Executive Member of GM PSTRC EMB
  • Lead Governor, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust
  • PPI Participant in Research – UoM Division of Cardiovascular Sciences/Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
  • OUTREACH Trial Steering Committee Member – MAHSC @ The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

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Rationale

For the latest embodiment of the Greater Manchester PSTRC, it was decided to enhance the governance of the Centre by adding a lay dimension to the process. The intention is to broaden the accountability of the Centre by providing a challenging influence at Executive Board level which is not motivated purely by the academic and research aspects of the group, rather by an independent or external view of the workings of the Centre. Assurance on features such as budget, timeline & milestones, adherence to the Centre’s primary brief and purpose and its actual achievements can thus be measured in a more rounded way.

Action

As a result, the position of non-executive lay board member has been created, with the intention of having two such people on the EMB.

Benefits to the Centre

With a lay aspect applied to the governance of the Centre, the following challenges, amongst others, can be more objectively presented during the assurance seeking process at management board meetings:

  • Is the Centre fulfilling its general brief?
  • Is the programme of events going to plan?
  • Do any methods or processes need considering for modification in any way?
  • Are the ongoing activities proving to be appropriately relevant?
  • Are any ‘spin-off’ benefits being realised?
  • Is the Centre performing in accordance with the designated budget?
  • Is the Centre performing such that its reputation will generate further opportunities?

Bearing in mind the above, it seems reasonable to expect the Centre to operate in a more direct and effective way, which will in turn improve the outcome and enhance the experience of not only those participating directly in the research themes but also those managing and supporting the venture.

Benefits to the Lay Non-Executives

As far as the non-executive lay board members are concerned, I see the satisfaction of taking on a challenge, contributing to the success of the Centre and widening one’s experience as providing good enough reason for becoming involved. Moreover, meeting the wide range of people involved in carrying out the role is a bonus to me.

Want to get involved?

4 Jan

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We are looking for a Non-Executive lay member to join the Executive Management Board for the NIHR Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre (Greater Manchester PSTRC).

Could that person be you?

Closing date: Monday 22nd January 2018 at 5pm

Time commitment:  Regular meetings over a 2 year period

We are looking for someone who can :

  • lead and represent the patient/public voice of the Greater Manchester PSTRC by membership of the Executive Management Board and theme/project review meetings
  • represent the Greater Manchester PSTRC to outside bodies as required and provide  a patient/public perspective to the Greater Manchester PSTRC strategic plan.

You will have:

  • An understanding of executive committee processes.
  • An understanding of governance processes at an executive level.
  • An understanding of NHS healthcare structures and issues in Greater Manchester and the UK.
  • Responsibility to ensure that the Greater Manchester PSTRC Executive Management Board is kept appropriately informed of involvement and engagement progress, impact and concerns within the Greater Manchester PSTRC.
  • the skills and knowledge to contribute to a range of involvement and engagement meetings.

Full copy of the role description and person specification.

Appointment for the Non- Exec lay member position will be made by shortlisting and a face-to-face formal interview.

If you have any questions about the role, please contact Dr Sally Giles, PPI Lead by email sally.giles@manchester.ac.uk or phone 0161 306 8020.

If you would like to apply, please fill out the following forms:

  • Application form
  • Equality monitoring form

which can be downloaded in the application pack and return by email to Dr Sally Giles at sally.giles@manchester.ac.uk

FOR INFORMATION   – Payments policy

NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Meet the Team – Sally Giles

12 May

The seventh in our NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC ‘Meet the Team’ series introduces Sally Giles, Research Fellow in our Core PPI research theme

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