Tag Archives: communication

How can we improve safe communication and co-ordination of care between primary and secondary care?

19 Apr

Part four in the James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership blog series: Part One, Part Two, Part Three

by John Taylor, patient attendee of the JLA Primary Care Patient Safety PSP final workshop

JLA PSP Top 10_Number 3Question 1 for me is, have there been any high grade research papers published already on this subject? If yes, then are there meta-analyses showing useable findings, and how old are these and have the findings been overtaken by newer recommendations?

Acting as Devil’s Advocate I would ask ‘who has posed this topic’ and ‘what evidence has been the basis for it’ and ‘how reliable or high grade is the evidence?’

As a  patient with multimorbidity, I personally feel that communications and coordination of care between primary care in its broadest sense and secondary care are often multi-centred and compartmentalised by ‘treatment episodes’ only indirectly linked, and even then through less than state of the art IT systems which may or may not be multi-site interoperable, which makes communication often slow, occasionally lost in space or paper chases and definitely not entirely in the best interest of good patient care.

So, how could improvements which would benefit the whole system be researched and put into practice?

Should lessons be learned from commercial users of communication systems who successfully run large scale businesses and care for the wants and needs of customers in ways which fulfil demand and generate repeat business, i.e. satisfied end users, and also learn from systems which have failed in their purpose due to poor design or uneconomic cost over runs or just failing to understand the needs of the users. Best practice should produce the designed outcomes consistently and be adaptable to cope with new needs as they are identified and designed to do this with minimum disruption and cost, there are many Healthcare Providers who have produced local workarounds which suit the needs of patients and providers with safe communications and care, NHS England, NHS Digital or NIHR RfPB (National Institute for Health Research Research for Patient Benefit) might be the vector to investigate how these develop and how well they might scale up.

I am constantly amazed and delighted at how, for example, Amazon handle their returns communications and customer care, they will respond to a ring back request within seconds, take the details, issue a printable label, arrange pick up and confirm by email then refund or replace as soon as the item is received at their depot. If Amazon and others can do this why is it so difficult for primary, secondary and, dare I say it, social care to learn how to communicate safely, rapidly and without arguing over ownership between themselves and patients, so that information flows freely, accurately and safely through the system, benefiting patients and providers alike.

Accurate and timely information is the key to good outcomes and thus improvements need to be constantly sought and implemented, carrying on doing what we have always done is not an option.

Thinking outside of the box: presenting patient safety issues creatively

30 Mar

by Sally Giles, Research Fellow in PPI Research and Jackie Nightingale, member of the Greater Manchester PSTRC Research User Group

In 2016 Sally Giles (Research Fellow, Core Theme) took part in the Academy of Creative Minds programme which brought together a dynamic, disparate group of artists, from composers to circus performers, directors to writers. These artists shared their ‘tricks of the trade’ with health researchers, to help them build confidence and expertise in using the creative arts to convey research messages in a more powerful and meaningful way.

As part of the programme Sally was required to work with one or more of the artists to produce a creative way of conveying a research message of her choice.  Sally worked with a circus performer to develop a way of highlighting communication issues in general practice and how this can affect patient safety.  As part of this process Jackie Nightingale (a member of the Greater Manchester PSTRC Research User Group) was asked to get involved in developing this performance.  Jackie played a starring role as the main patient in the scene.  Their full performance was a major part of the NHS R+D North West Annual Research Conference (video above).

Both Jackie and Sally thoroughly enjoyed the experience and would recommend the course to anyone who would like the opportunity to think outside of the box when trying to get research messages across in an enjoyable and innovative way.