Tag Archives: collaboration

New Patient Safety Translational Research Centre PhD network

2 Aug

Young man using laptop with female student watching and smiling

by Karen Considine (Centre Manager, NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC), Kelsey Flott (Centre Manager, NIHR Imperial PSTRC) and Beth Fylan (Programme Manager, NIHR Yorkshire and Humber PSTRC)

PhD students linked to the three NIHR Patient Safety Translational Research Centres (PSTRCs) have a new opportunity to register for a PhD student network. The national drive for high quality patient safety research means that the NIHR has now invested in three PSTRCs from 2017-2022. Greater Manchester and Imperial PSTRCs retain their funding and there is now a new third Centre in Yorkshire and Humber. This extension to the PSTRC infrastructure has created opportunities to expand the number of NIHR funded patient safety projects and develop new patient safety research partnerships and networks.

One of these collaborative initiatives is aimed at offering development activities to PhD students by creating a network bringing together PSTRC research students from the three Centres into a dynamic research community. The PSTRC PhD network will encourage students to share information about their research projects and their developing research expertise and then collaborate to develop dissemination plans for their work. The network will be a showcase for the patient safety research projects students are delivering as well as a route to further enhance patient safety research skills by accessing expertise across the PSTRC infrastructure.

Rebecca Lawton, Director of the Yorkshire and Humber PSTRC, said:  “As a new PSTRC we are committed to collaborating with our partners at Manchester and Imperial. We pitched the idea of a PhD network to NIHR and they were extremely supportive. The aim of this network is ensure that the patient safety research leaders of the future have an opportunity to learn from each other and also from the wealth of expertise across the three Centres. I am looking forward to watching the network grow and to learning from the next generation of patient safety researchers ”.

Stephen Campbell, Director of the Greater Manchester PSTRC, said: “Research capacity building is a core and crucial priority for us and all the PSTRCs. The PhD network provides a splendid opportunity for researchers from across the three settings to learn from  each other, research leaders from each site and the importance of collaboration in research”.

Ara Darzi from Imperial PSTRC adds: “Together the three PSTRCs aim to develop evidence based interventions to improve safety across the NHS and health systems abroad. Central to this mission is the training of our students and researchers. This PhD network will provide an opportunity for students across the PSTRCs to collaborate, share insights and create a national network for patient safety research.”

Connected Health Cities and the Greater Manchester PSTRC

2 Aug

Connected Health Cities logo_cropped

by Niels Peek, Research Lead for Safety Informatics theme, NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC

The Safety Informatics theme in the Greater Manchester PSTRC extends and translates the principles of ‘learning health systems’ to develop technologies and information behaviours that create safer care systems. It does this by enabling:

  1. continuous professional and organisational learning
  2. accelerated translation of evidence into practice
  3. system-wide patient safety that crosses sector boundaries.

In all these activities, the Safety Informatics theme builds heavily on experiences and achievements in Connected Health Cities (CHC), a programme of work across 4 city regions in North England that is funded by the Department of Health and Social Care and commissioned by the Northern Health Science Alliance (NHSA). This programme aims to optimise care pathways by employing analytical technologies to routinely collected, local health data. In each of the 4 regions several pathways have been selected to develop and test this use of technologies. In addition the programme has extensive workstreams on workforce development, industry partnerships, and public engagement.

In the Greater Manchester Connected Health City (GMCHC), the two main care pathways project focus on:

  1. antibiotic prescribing in primary care (lead: Tjeerd van Staa)
  2. triage, diagnosis, and acute treatment of strokes (lead: Adrian Parry-Jones).

In both pathways there is a trade-off between safety of individual patients and population health generally. This trade-off can only be accurately studied by linking data from across different healthcare sectors, such as primary and secondary care. For instance, ambulance paramedics are sometimes risk averse and tend to bring everyone who might have had a stroke to one of the three specialised acute stroke units in Greater Manchester – but these specialised units have therefore become overburdened. Similarly, our analyses of antibiotic prescribing data indicate that these prescriptions are often not guided by risk of severe infection (e.g. pneumonia) and thus unnecessarily drive antimicrobial resistance in the community. In both care pathways we are now implementing electronic decision support tools for care providers to address the issues.

Greater Manchester provides a unique environment for implementing learning health systems, because the devolution context allows to offset investments in primary care with savings in secondary care and vice versa. Therefore GMCHC works closely with regional partners such as Health Innovation Manchester and the GM Health and Social Care Partnership. Both organisations have embedded the CHC principles in their digital innovation and health intelligence strategies.

 

Health Innovation Manchester Patient Safety Collaborative

3 May

The PSTRC’s second core aim is to deliver “a translation pipeline” that feeds the outputs, products and learning from our work to local and national policymakers and health and care providers. The PSTRC works closely with Health Innovation Manchester, which is an academic health science system that brings together the research, education and clinical excellence of the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC)-designated Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) with the expertise and national connections of the Greater Manchester Academic Health Science Network (GM AHSN). This will ensure scarce financial and workforce resources are used to provide value for money and safer health and care.

The PSTRC has developed strong links with the Health and Social Care system in Greater Manchester and Health Innovation Manchester, as well as the Patient Safety Collaboratives and Academic Health Science Networks in Greater Manchester and the East Midlands.  PSTRC staff are members of the Health Innovation Manchester Patient Safety Collaborative Steering Group (Ashcroft, Campbell) and the Research and Evaluation Committee for Patient Safety Collaborative-East Midlands (Waring).

Examples of specific projects will include the PSTRC working with:

  • The Greater Manchester Patient Safety Collaborative on its deteriorating patient agenda with plans to develop an ‘early warning’ tool for identifying and responding to deteriorating patients following discharge from hospital to a community setting
  • The Christie NHS Foundation Trust on on optimising safe follow-up and patient experience after discharge from out-patient care
  • A range of health and care and voluntary organisations in developing its research on homelessness
  • NHS England and NHS Improvement to reduce the level of medication error across the NHS
  • NICE, DHSC, NHS England and Health Education England to reduce suicide rates and self-harm
  • The Manchester Patient Safety Collaborative to implement the Patient Safety Toolkit across Greater Manchester.

How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

3 May

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This edition’s reflection comes from Lauren Worrall, a pharmacist who is involved in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative.

Lauren, why did you become involved in the Greater Manchester Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative?

My motivation to join the collaborative was to receive training on different skills and techniques to improve patient safety within my own practice area.  Furthermore I wanted to explore the world of research within pharmacy.

How do you think the Greater Manchester PSTRC benefitted from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

As a group we devise potential ways to improve practice and develop various interventions.  As an individual I can then go out and test the efficacy of the interventions in pharmacy practice settings. My experience in community pharmacy allows me to positively contribute to the work of the collaborative.

Personally and professionally, how do you feel you benefitted from your involvement?

Getting involved with the group has allowed me to work with other pharmacists and safety experts to reflect upon and improve my own practice. It has also afforded me a better knowledge of what is involved in research.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other healthcare professionals? If so, why?

Participating in research allows you to be creative and explore innovative methods in whichever healthcare setting you are working in. If you are interested in improving your practice and that of others then I would highly recommend getting involved.

Pharmacists working towards safety improvements

3 May

CP Patient Safety Collaborative image

The Greater Manchester PSTRC’s Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative was set up by the PSTRC to encourage a mutually-beneficial dialogue between community pharmacy workers and researchers, and ultimately to improve patient safety.

The PSTRC’s Medication Safety team shares their knowledge on best practice in patient safety and risk management techniques with the Collaborative and in turn, the Collaborative shares their experiences and insights of practical day-to-day pharmacy practice with the PSTRC.

The group of 9 pharmacists are employed in a range of pharmacies from small independents to large chains, and they meet on a monthly basis. Sessions involve teaching of safety concepts and risk management techniques, sharing of experiences and discussions on the issues currently impacting on the safety of work in pharmacies. Outside of the sessions, the Collaborative engages in research-based activities – such as audits, or applying the taught risk management techniques to their own practice – with a view to sharing their insights within the group.

Pharmacists have seen real-world benefit through their involvement in the Collaborative:

  • James Hind, Community Pharmacist, says:  “I developed the idea of label that could be attached to the dispensing bag. I wanted something that could be used as a quick check (have we got the right patient; did we tell them what their medication was for, and are they confident that they know how to use it).”
  • Tomasz Niebudek, Community Pharmacist, says: “The tool that, in my opinion, had the biggest impact on my practice was PRIMO (Proactive Risk Monitoring for Organisational Learning). This was a questionnaire given to all staff members in my team to find out what affects their ability to dispense accurately. I have very carefully analysed all the data from those questionnaires and shared my conclusions with my whole team during a staff meeting. We have straight away implemented changes to our practice.”

You can read more about the Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative in our blog series.

The NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative: part one

20 Apr

by Penny Lewis, Medication Safety theme

Comm Pharm Pt Safety Collaborative

The community pharmacy patient safety collaborative has reached six months of age. Over this period, ten pharmacists who work across Greater Manchester have come together regularly with research staff from the Greater Manchester PSTRC to learn about quality and safety improvement.

The collaborative members’ first assignment has been to create a ‘safety case’ for their pharmacies. Safety cases are a recognised approach to safety management in other safety critical industries (such as aviation and petrochemicals) but are relatively new to healthcare. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that safety cases have been used in community pharmacy. In order to write their cases, the collaborative members have learned how to use risk assessment techniques such as Failure Modes Effect Analysis (FMEA), Systematic Human Error Reduction and Prevention Analysis (SHERPA), Proactive Risk Monitoring for Organisational learning (PRIMO), Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA) along with Plan Do Study Act (PDSA) cycles to explore potential and actual patient safety issues in pharmacies.  As well as familiarising themselves with a ridiculously large number of acronyms, the collaborative has used their newly acquired knowledge to investigate and deal with the risks associated with community pharmacy activities such as medication dispensing, provision of monitored dosage systems and delivery services.

In addition to hearing from Greater Manchester PSTRC researchers, the collaborative has also had a guest presentation from Professor Todd Boyle of St Francis Xavier University, Canada, who talked about his work in quality improvement across pharmacies in Canada, and Sarah Ingleby, lead nurse in acute care at Central Manchester University Hospital, who popped over to talk about her involvement in producing a safety case for sepsis in secondary care.

The next few months will hopefully see the recruitment of more collaborative members, including pharmacy technicians. In future meetings we will be exploring further risk management techniques and finding out more about the initiatives that have already been implemented.   In future blogs you will hear from members of the collaborative, who will share their experiences of being involved in patient safety research.  For now, the team at the Greater Manchester PSTRC would like to thank all those who have contributed to the success of the collaborative so far.

Read part two of the blog series.

Read part three of the blog series.