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NHS70 Excellence in Primary Care Award for Nottingham’s Medicine Safety Research Group

22 May

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The Medicine Safety Research Group at The University of Nottingham is the regional winner of the Excellence in Primary Care Award category of the NHS70 Parliamentary Awards and is shortlisted for the national award.

The research group was nominated by the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EM AHSN), who highlighted a number of developments which are already improving, and will continue to improve, prescribing safety in primary care. These include:

  1. Improving the safety of medicines prescribing through the design and testing of an intervention called PINCER.
  2. Development of ‘prescribing safety indicators’ which are now used in GP computer software to avoid prescribing errors
  3. Identifying the frequency, nature and causes of prescribing errors in general practice, leading to:
  4. Developed a Patient Safety Toolkit for GPs, which is available on the RCGP website and has been accessed over 10,000 times.

The Medication Safety theme of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC has worked closely with the award-winning Nottingham-based research team on many of the developments. A number of these projects and interventions will be developed further over the coming years, through a continued collaboration between the Greater Manchester PSTRC and the University of Nottingham.

Risk Management: developing a learning resource to support pharmacy teams across England

3 May

Risk man guide supported by NIHR GM PSTRC

Good risk management is well recognised as the cornerstone of safe practice in the workplace and risk assessment has long been part of legal requirements for health and safety in UK workplaces.

In 2017, the World Health Organisation highlighted the importance of medication error by choosing the issue of medication-related harm as the focus of its Global Challenge. In response to this, the Medication Safety theme of the Greater Manchester PSTRC worked with CPPE (The Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education) to develop their learning resources on Risk Management.

This was an ideal opportunity for the PSTRC, allowing the team to apply their broad expertise in theoretical risk management concepts to the challenges of the pharmacy context but also enabling them to incorporate the expertise and insights from the PSTRC’s Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative – a group of current in-practice community pharmacists working in the Greater Manchester region (see blog post for more information).

This ensured that the guide would be both theoretically sound in terms of risk management but also enriched with examples that pharmacists saw as pertinent to their day to day work.

Through the co-development of this guide, it was recognised that this could be part of something with much greater impact and, as a result, CPPE dedicated their 2018 learning campaign to be focussed on the topic of Patient Safety, using the guide as a focal point to provide the theoretical background for the campaign.

The guide was distributed to over 67 500 pharmacy professionals as part of CPPE Patient Safety campaign. The PSTRC continued to support CPPE designing appropriate learning activities that would be delivered by CPPE – including face to face “focal point” sessions with over 100 events due to run nationally throughout England and online weekly activities in Feb/Mar 2018 – including an e-challenge quiz and encouraging involvement via Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. This resulted in over 1500 individuals signing up to the campaign activities over the six week period and continuing beyond this with pharmacists still adding their intentions to improve patient safety on CPPE’s ‘Pledge Wall’.

Matthew Shaw, interim director of CPPE, was delighted at the opportunity to collaborate with PSTRC recognising the huge value of building an evidence base into this core learning programme. He commented “It has been a great opportunity to work with PSTRC to link theory with practice and through this to support pharmacy professionals across the country to make their practice safer, and to reduce the risks to people using our services.”

PhD Fellow Focus: Ahmed Ashour

3 May

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Ahmed Ashour is the latest PhD student to join the NIHR Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre at The University of Manchester. Ahmed began his PhD in January 2018, having graduated with a distinction MPharm degree in the summer of 2017. He has worked in community pharmacy since 2014 in a variety of roles including as a dispenser, pre-registration pharmacist and ultimately a community pharmacist. Ahmed’s main passion derives from personal development and he has taken an active interest in ways of developing communication skills, especially in young people.

Ahmed’s research will revolve around identifying the skills that are essential to patient safety in community pharmacy. These skills are complementary to the technical knowledge acquired by pharmacists at university and while on their pre-registration placement. Since the 1970s, other sectors have extensively researched the impact non-technical skills have on outcomes, with many areas in healthcare now using specific classifications to identify these skills, in addition to the elements and behaviours attributed to safe practice.

Ahmed aims to present these skills to be able to ensure pharmacists in the future are well equipped with the skills that are necessary for the central role they now play in the health of communities all around the country. Ahmed will aim to identify these skills by first looking at the role community pharmacists currently play within the healthcare team, and then extracting the skills that are required to complete the tasks involved within this role.

How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

3 May

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This edition’s reflection comes from Lauren Worrall, a pharmacist who is involved in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative.

Lauren, why did you become involved in the Greater Manchester Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative?

My motivation to join the collaborative was to receive training on different skills and techniques to improve patient safety within my own practice area.  Furthermore I wanted to explore the world of research within pharmacy.

How do you think the Greater Manchester PSTRC benefitted from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

As a group we devise potential ways to improve practice and develop various interventions.  As an individual I can then go out and test the efficacy of the interventions in pharmacy practice settings. My experience in community pharmacy allows me to positively contribute to the work of the collaborative.

Personally and professionally, how do you feel you benefitted from your involvement?

Getting involved with the group has allowed me to work with other pharmacists and safety experts to reflect upon and improve my own practice. It has also afforded me a better knowledge of what is involved in research.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other healthcare professionals? If so, why?

Participating in research allows you to be creative and explore innovative methods in whichever healthcare setting you are working in. If you are interested in improving your practice and that of others then I would highly recommend getting involved.

Pharmacists working towards safety improvements

3 May

CP Patient Safety Collaborative image

The Greater Manchester PSTRC’s Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative was set up by the PSTRC to encourage a mutually-beneficial dialogue between community pharmacy workers and researchers, and ultimately to improve patient safety.

The PSTRC’s Medication Safety team shares their knowledge on best practice in patient safety and risk management techniques with the Collaborative and in turn, the Collaborative shares their experiences and insights of practical day-to-day pharmacy practice with the PSTRC.

The group of 9 pharmacists are employed in a range of pharmacies from small independents to large chains, and they meet on a monthly basis. Sessions involve teaching of safety concepts and risk management techniques, sharing of experiences and discussions on the issues currently impacting on the safety of work in pharmacies. Outside of the sessions, the Collaborative engages in research-based activities – such as audits, or applying the taught risk management techniques to their own practice – with a view to sharing their insights within the group.

Pharmacists have seen real-world benefit through their involvement in the Collaborative:

  • James Hind, Community Pharmacist, says:  “I developed the idea of label that could be attached to the dispensing bag. I wanted something that could be used as a quick check (have we got the right patient; did we tell them what their medication was for, and are they confident that they know how to use it).”
  • Tomasz Niebudek, Community Pharmacist, says: “The tool that, in my opinion, had the biggest impact on my practice was PRIMO (Proactive Risk Monitoring for Organisational Learning). This was a questionnaire given to all staff members in my team to find out what affects their ability to dispense accurately. I have very carefully analysed all the data from those questionnaires and shared my conclusions with my whole team during a staff meeting. We have straight away implemented changes to our practice.”

You can read more about the Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative in our blog series.

Making prescribing safer with PINCER

16 Mar

Pharmacist

Recent news reports brought home the importance of reducing medication errors in healthcare. The news coverage highlighted that research, conducted by university academics in Manchester, Sheffield and York estimated 230,000 errors each year in the administering of medication in the NHS, contributing to 22,000 deaths. While the majority of these errors are spotted (and corrected) at the point of error, or do not threaten patient safety, a drastic reduction in the number of errors is now being called for. A change from the current culture of blame to a learning culture is one solution being discussed, but there are other, more practical interventions already in existence.

Once such intervention, called PINCER, is a pharmacist-led intervention developed at the Universities of Nottingham, Manchester and Edinburgh. PINCER has been shown to be an effective method for reducing a range of clinically important and commonly made medication errors in primary care.  Using a set of ‘prescribing safety indicators’ which identify common, but potentially harmful, medication prescribing errors, the intervention involves:

  •         Running searches on GP computer systems to identify patients at risk from common and important prescribing and drug monitoring errors
  •         Pharmacists – trained in the PINCER approach – working with individual general practices to develop an action plan to address the issues identified
  •         Pharmacists (and pharmacy technicians) working with and supporting general practice staff to implement the action plan.

With funding from the Health Foundation and East Midlands Academic Health Science Network, PINCER has been rolled out to 360 practices across the East Midlands since September 2015.  Over 2.9 million patient records have been searched, identifying over 21,000 instances of hazardous prescribing. Applying trends from data collected as part of the evaluation of the rollout, it is estimated that over 10,500 patients have received an active intervention resulting in safer care as a direct benefit of implementing the intervention.

The PINCER intervention has been incorporated into national guidelines to support medicines optimisation by NICE and a more detailed evaluation of the rollout in the East midlands is being done as part of a new NIHR funded programme grant called PRoTeCT to explore whether implementing PINCER reduces avoidable medication-related harm and hospital admissions.

Past PhD Fellows: Where are they now? Christian Jones

1 Feb

In this new series, we catch up with past Greater Manchester PSTRC PhD Fellows to see what they are doing now and how their PhD projects affected patient safety. Our first past PhD Fellow is Christian Jones.

Christian Jones photo_cropped

What did you learn during your PhD project?

My PhD project focused on how and why community pharmacy staff deviate from or bypass procedures. Although the idea of not following the rules might sound sinister, my project highlighted that staff use their professional judgement daily to tailor care to patient’s individual needs.

My PhD project also taught me many personal skills. I learnt about the importance of being passionate about your work and the importance of being determined, focused and tenacious in order to reach a goal. I’m so grateful for the PhD experience and for the support that I received from my supervisors and colleagues – definitely some of the best years of my life so far!

How has your PhD changed the patient safety landscape?  

My PhD has illuminated how procedures are viewed and followed in practice by both pharmacists and pharmacy support staff. As well as exploring the types of violations that occur in this setting and why, I was also the first to explore the impact of motivation, opportunity and capability on the frequency of violations in this setting.

What you are doing now and where you see yourself going in your future career?

I now work as a senior project manager for the community pharmacy commissioning team at NHS England. So far, it has been fascinating to understand how policies are created and implemented on a national scale. I am also an honorary lecturer at the University of Manchester, which means a great deal as I adore teaching and I am passionate about patient safety research.

For the future, I would love to continue building a career in community pharmacy policy and research alongside my own blog on mindfulness.