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ReVerse: creative conversations between mental health service users and staff

6 Jun

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Mental health service users, carers and staff have much in common these days coping with stress and distress, especially at a time of huge pressure on services.

ReVerse workshops aim to equalise the space between mental health service users and staff, to creatively nurture insight, dialogue and healing relationships about patient safety in mental health services and research.

We think a good way to do this is through poetry and spoken word. Creative formats can provide a different angle and unique insight into ourselves, others and our collective wellbeing, and provide those who often feel they are not heard with an opportunity to express their voices. Exploring metaphor and meaning can offer new dimensions to personal and professional health and research relationships.

The workshops are open to mental health service users, carers and staff (including clinical, research, managerial, administrative and support staff). We aim to have an equal mix of staff and service users. ReVerse workshops will include:

  • Examples and readings of poetry and/or spoken word, drawing from different experiences of mental health 
  • Discussions and reflections
  • Having a go: producing your own poetry or prose.

The ReVerse initiative is a collaboration between David Gilbert (poet, Patient Director and mental health service user) and Bella Starling (Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow, Director of Public Programmes Team, Manchester University NHS Trust) and the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC.

For more information behind the workshops, see David’s recent blog post.

Our first workshop takes place in Ziferblat Media City on Tuesday 3 July, register your interest on our Eventbrite page. Registration is free, but requires a commitment to attend.

These workshops are pilots as part of an exciting new initiative. Those involved will help to shape the future development of this ReVerse Programme.

NHS70 Excellence in Primary Care Award for Nottingham’s Medicine Safety Research Group

22 May

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The Medicine Safety Research Group at The University of Nottingham is the regional winner of the Excellence in Primary Care Award category of the NHS70 Parliamentary Awards and is shortlisted for the national award.

The research group was nominated by the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EM AHSN), who highlighted a number of developments which are already improving, and will continue to improve, prescribing safety in primary care. These include:

  1. Improving the safety of medicines prescribing through the design and testing of an intervention called PINCER.
  2. Development of ‘prescribing safety indicators’ which are now used in GP computer software to avoid prescribing errors
  3. Identifying the frequency, nature and causes of prescribing errors in general practice, leading to:
  4. Developed a Patient Safety Toolkit for GPs, which is available on the RCGP website and has been accessed over 10,000 times.

The Medication Safety theme of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC has worked closely with the award-winning Nottingham-based research team on many of the developments. A number of these projects and interventions will be developed further over the coming years, through a continued collaboration between the Greater Manchester PSTRC and the University of Nottingham.

Working together to help patients and carers to be more involved in safety

3 May

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The patient safety guide has been co-developed with patients, carers, general practitioners and pharmacists. We have worked together from the initial idea, to decide the focus of the guide, the first draft all the way through to refining it.

One key discussion we had early was a preference to develop a digital app based version to compliment the paper version which we are now doing. In March we held two more co-design events. In the first event we discussed what the app should include and key features that people like in an app, what they don’t like and what the guide app should include.

At the second event we discussed testing and piloting the guide package in practice for patients and carers and how would it be used with GPs, pharmacists and other healthcare staff. These discussions will be used to shape the next phase of the guide project to develop an app and test the full guide package.

Thanks to everyone who came along and got involved! If you’d like to find out more about the patient safety guide project or future opportunities to get involved please contact Dr Rebecca Morris.

Safety in Marginalised Groups: Why a new theme for the PSTRC?

1 Feb

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Much of the work that took place in the first NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC focused on involving patients and carers in its work. Examples of this were the James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership, and public engagement events such as The Nest and More Than Just a Number.

In the second incarnation of the Greater Manchester PSTRC, one of the four themes, and a new theme for the centre, is Safety in Marginalised Groups. This research theme will focus on improving patient safety for marginalised groups of people, who are at a higher risk of harm within the healthcare system. The increased risk can be caused by a number of factors, for example, we know that Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups have poorer health outcomes, as well as poorer access to, and experiences of, healthcare services. People may also be marginalised because of stigma and poor access to services for specific conditions (e.g. mental health problems). Or they may be marginalised because of the circumstances or settings in which they live (e.g. living alone, caring for someone at home, living in a rural setting, in a care home or prison, or being homeless).

This theme has two main strands of research: the first on mental health and the second on patients and carers. Over the next five years, the Safety in Marginalised Groups theme researchers will work closely with researchers in other themes to explore a number of key issues, challenges and opportunities for improving safety in marginalised groups including:

  • communication
  • self-management: the co-design of tools to aid patients in their healthcare journeys
  • using mobile technology to monitor health.

A major component of the new theme will be mental health and it is particularly exciting that the PSTRC will be teaming up with the Centre for Mental Health and Safety. Some of the key safety outcomes in mental health involve suicide or self-harm. The proposed programme of work will look at the components of a ‘safe mental health service’ as well as investigating treatment gaps in the care of people who self-harm.

Find out more on our Safety in Marginalised Groups webpage.

How do I get more involved in my patient safety?

1 Feb

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We have been working together with patients, carers, members of the public, GPs and pharmacists to design a PSTRC patient safety guide for patients and carers. This will be a useful resource to help answer key questions about primary care patient safety and to identify points where patients and carers can make their own care safer.

The guide consists of a short booklet, website and cue card prompts which people can use flexibly:

  • to plan for a consultation
  • as a memory aid
  • to help make the most of the time a person has with a healthcare professional
  • to support their own care at home.

As part of this project, the PSTRC has held co-design events which have brought together members of the public, patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists to discuss how everyone can work together to make care safer. Discussions have focused on key points in the care pathway and actions that each person could identify to improve their patient safety with the priorities that were identified for their own care. These discussions were then used to develop and refine the guide.

Since completing the initial development stage of the patient safety guide, work has been taking place with key national stakeholders to further refine the guide and the centre will continue to co-develop the project and the testing of it with patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

If you’re interested in hearing more about the guide, or to find out more about future co-design events, please contact Rebecca Morris at rebecca.morris@manchester.ac.uk.

New Theme Overview: Safer Care Systems and Transitions

1 Feb

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The research for this new theme will take place at the Universities of Nottingham (lead: Justin Waring) and Manchester (lead: Stephen Campbell) and sites of study include hospitals, mental health services, community pharmacy and primary care.

A patient’s journey through different parts of the health service is called a “pathway,” and it is already known that patients can be put at particular risk when they move along their pathway and receive care from different organisations. Concerns for patients might include: “Has all the relevant information been passed from my GP to my hospital consultant (or the other way round)? Am I getting the same advice from different health professionals about my health problems or are people giving me contradictory advice?” Patient transfers, i.e. when people are in between different services and perhaps reliant on self-care or support from family members, can bring additional risks.

In this theme, these issues will be explored in four main topics:

  • ‘mental health’ (also in collaboration with the Marginalised Groups theme)
  • ‘information storage and transfer systems’ and ‘patient-held care records’ (both in collaboration with the Safety Informatics theme)
  • ‘governance and regulation’ (in collaboration with the Medication Safety theme)

Specific research projects being worked up include threats to safety in mental health transitions, and the potential role of patient-held care records in improving safety across the patient pathway. Through this programme of work, the key factors in transitional safety will be identified, followed by the development and testing of new systems of routine data collection and analysis to measure them.