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How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

2 Aug

This edition’s reflection comes from Kay Gallacher, a member of the public who is involved in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Patient Safety Guide.

Kay Gallacher PSG_lightened_cropped

Why did you become involved in the Patient Safety Guide project?

I have long been aware of the issues that elderly family and neighbours, in particular have experienced trying to manage contact with their GPs and pharmacies.  The brilliant, simple idea behind this Patient Safety Guide seems to address many of the concerns in a practical and tangible way.  I was also attracted by the fact that this was a collaborative project where patients, carers and medical professionals all have an equally important input into the design and delivery of both the paper- based Guide and the mobile app, hopefully making it a 360 degrees (all round) useful tool.

How do you think the Greater Manchester PSTRC benefitted from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

I guess it’s for others to judge what impact, if any, I’ve had on the project.  However, I’ve brought a genuine understanding of the problems patients face when coming into contact with primary care and producing leaflets and guides was bread and butter for me in my marketing career.  So, I hope I’ve been helpful in producing and delivering an effective product.

How do you feel that you benefitted from your involvement?

I am involved with several projects, but this one in particular has sharpened my understanding of how the GP/ patient dynamic operates.  I came to this project with a patient’s viewpoint but I now have a better insight into the challenges GPs face in establishing and maintaining effective communication with patients.  Also, the deep personal satisfaction of feeling that I’ve made a positive contribution.  Importantly, I can’t overstate the pleasure I’ve derived from being part of a cohesive, effective and well-led team composed of great people from a wide range of backgrounds.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other patients and carers? If so, why?

Definitely!!  What you get from being involved largely depends on what you put into it but I can absolutely guarantee that, regardless of your starting point, you will have a better understanding of the workings of medical research and the wider world of medicine in general.

Exploring self-management and culturally appropriate patient feedback among British Bangladeshis in Manchester

2 Aug
British Bangladeshis article_visual minutes

Visual minutes from the workshop capture the main discussion points

by Papreen Nahar and Caroline Sanders

Previous Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) workshops within the DEPEND project have indicated a need to consider Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups. On September 21st, 2017,  two public engagement workshops were conducted in Manchester with a BME population – namely British Bangladeshis – to discuss their views and experiences of ‘self-management’ for long-term conditions, as well as the capturing and use of patient feedback and the potential of digital interventions. British Bangladeshis are a significant immigrant population, comprising 13% of foreign-born residents in England. In Manchester, Bangladeshis ranked second among South Asians for persistent inequalities reported, particularly Bangladeshi women. To maintain culturally appropriate language and gender segregation, the workshops were conducted in Bengali, and separately with men and women. Two professional artists were invited to prepare visual reports on the sessions. 

The Bangladesh High Commission, Greater Manchester Bangladeshi Association (GMBA), and Krishnochura (a British Bangladeshi cultural group) were the partners for these workshops. UK-based Bengali TV channels also highlighted the workshops, as these events were the first of their kind.

Following are the highlights from the workshops:

On Self-Management

  • Neither men nor women were generally aware of the concept of ‘self-management’, and they did not consider themselves as practicing self-management for chronic conditions.
  • Culture-specific lifestyles, food habits, notions about health & wellbeing, and specific gender roles for women were considered the other barriers for self- management.

On Patient Feedback

  • Most of the men and women have never been asked to provide feedback by the authority.
  • The general fear is that the negative feedback may affect their future treatment at GP centres.
  • They felt unstructured questionnaires and a bi-lingual feedback system would be useful.

On Digitalisation

  • Remote monitoring using digital tools (e.g. mobile apps) was viewed as a potential way of increasing awareness of self-management as well as providing feedback.
  • Digital illiteracy and language barriers were perceived to be obstacles to the use of digital tools in healthcare. However, the joint family structure (which is a common practice among this community) was considered an enabling factor in this regard, as the digitally literate younger generation could help the digitally illiterate older generation.

It was recommended that further research needs to be conducted to develop culturally sensitive co-designed digital tools to improve feedback and self-management.

ReVerse: creative conversations between mental health service users and staff

6 Jun

Words_ReVerse illustration_cropped

by Bella Starling

Mental health service users, carers and staff have much in common these days coping with stress and distress, especially at a time of huge pressure on services.

ReVerse workshops aim to equalise the space between mental health service users and staff, to creatively nurture insight, dialogue and healing relationships about patient safety in mental health services and research.

We think a good way to do this is through poetry and spoken word. Creative formats can provide a different angle and unique insight into ourselves, others and our collective wellbeing, and provide those who often feel they are not heard with an opportunity to express their voices. Exploring metaphor and meaning can offer new dimensions to personal and professional health and research relationships.

The workshops are open to mental health service users, carers and staff (including clinical, research, managerial, administrative and support staff). We aim to have an equal mix of staff and service users. ReVerse workshops will include:

  • Examples and readings of poetry and/or spoken word, drawing from different experiences of mental health 
  • Discussions and reflections
  • Having a go: producing your own poetry or prose.

The ReVerse initiative is a collaboration between David Gilbert (poet, Patient Director and mental health service user) and Bella Starling (Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow, Director of Public Programmes Team, Manchester University NHS Trust) and the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC.

For more information behind the workshops, see David’s recent blog post.

Our first workshop takes place in Ziferblat Media City on Tuesday 3 July, register your interest on our Eventbrite page. Registration is free, but requires a commitment to attend.

These workshops are pilots as part of an exciting new initiative. Those involved will help to shape the future development of this ReVerse Programme.

NHS70 Excellence in Primary Care Award for Nottingham’s Medicine Safety Research Group

22 May

Print

by Carly Rolfe, NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC

The Medicine Safety Research Group at The University of Nottingham is the regional winner of the Excellence in Primary Care Award category of the NHS70 Parliamentary Awards and is shortlisted for the national award.

The research group was nominated by the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EM AHSN), who highlighted a number of developments which are already improving, and will continue to improve, prescribing safety in primary care. These include:

  1. Improving the safety of medicines prescribing through the design and testing of an intervention called PINCER.
  2. Development of ‘prescribing safety indicators’ which are now used in GP computer software to avoid prescribing errors
  3. Identifying the frequency, nature and causes of prescribing errors in general practice, leading to:
  4. Developed a Patient Safety Toolkit for GPs, which is available on the RCGP website and has been accessed over 10,000 times.

The Medication Safety theme of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC has worked closely with the award-winning Nottingham-based research team on many of the developments. A number of these projects and interventions will be developed further over the coming years, through a continued collaboration between the Greater Manchester PSTRC and the University of Nottingham.

Working together to help patients and carers to be more involved in safety

3 May

Patient Safety guide logo_cropped

The patient safety guide has been co-developed with patients, carers, general practitioners and pharmacists. We have worked together from the initial idea, to decide the focus of the guide, the first draft all the way through to refining it.

One key discussion we had early was a preference to develop a digital app based version to compliment the paper version which we are now doing. In March we held two more co-design events. In the first event we discussed what the app should include and key features that people like in an app, what they don’t like and what the guide app should include.

At the second event we discussed testing and piloting the guide package in practice for patients and carers and how would it be used with GPs, pharmacists and other healthcare staff. These discussions will be used to shape the next phase of the guide project to develop an app and test the full guide package.

Thanks to everyone who came along and got involved! If you’d like to find out more about the patient safety guide project or future opportunities to get involved please contact Dr Rebecca Morris.