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How do I get more involved in my patient safety?

1 Feb

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We have been working together with patients, carers, members of the public, GPs and pharmacists to design a PSTRC patient safety guide for patients and carers. This will be a useful resource to help answer key questions about primary care patient safety and to identify points where patients and carers can make their own care safer.

The guide consists of a short booklet, website and cue card prompts which people can use flexibly:

  • to plan for a consultation
  • as a memory aid
  • to help make the most of the time a person has with a healthcare professional
  • to support their own care at home.

As part of this project, the PSTRC has held co-design events which have brought together members of the public, patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists to discuss how everyone can work together to make care safer. Discussions have focused on key points in the care pathway and actions that each person could identify to improve their patient safety with the priorities that were identified for their own care. These discussions were then used to develop and refine the guide.

Since completing the initial development stage of the patient safety guide, work has been taking place with key national stakeholders to further refine the guide and the centre will continue to co-develop the project and the testing of it with patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

If you’re interested in hearing more about the guide, or to find out more about future co-design events, please contact Rebecca Morris at rebecca.morris@manchester.ac.uk.

NAPCRG 45th annual meeting

1 Feb

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Sally Giles, Penny Lewis, Sarah Rodgers and Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) representative Antony Chuter presented a workshop at the recent Annual Meeting of the North American Primary Care Research Group (NAPCRG) in Montreal. The objectives of the workshop were to provide an overview of examples of current research into medication safety in primary care, discuss the challenges to medication safety and some of the tools that can be used in practice to improve medication safety.

Sarah highlighted the work of the ‘PINCER’ prescribing intervention and workshop participants worked through clinical scenarios using the PINCER indicators. Antony discussed his role as a PPI member in various medication safety research projects. This stimulated discussion around patient involvement in healthcare research, as this is a relatively new concept in North America.

Penny and Sally discussed patient involvement in medication safety and the development of the Manchester Patient Safety Framework (MaPSaF) with workshop participants engaging in discussions about how they currently involve patients in the prevention of safety incidents. The workshop was well attended by a mixture of primary care physicians, pharmacists and healthcare researchers and the topic fitted well with the patient-centred care theme of the conference.

Sally also presented her work on the primary care patient measure of safety (PC_PMOS) in a well-attended oral session. Sally’s work stimulated interest in the audience with US researchers hoping to carry out similar work in this area.

Where next for the James Lind Alliance? After 50 James Lind Alliance partnerships, what does the future hold?

1 Feb

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Last year, the PSTRC asked members of the public, patients, carers and healthcare professionals ‘What are your questions about primary care patient safety?’ This process was called a James Lind Alliance (JLA) Priority Setting Partnership (PSP). The aim of the JLA is to work with patients, carers and healthcare professionals to identify the questions they believe are a  priority for research to address. For our PSP the top 10 priorities included questions focused on the most vulnerable in society, holistic whole-person care, safer communication and co-ordination between care providers, work intensity, continuity of care, suicide risk, complex care at home, and confidentiality. This was the first national prioritisation of future research for primary care patient safety and helped shaped our new PSTRC focus.

There have now been over 50 JLA partnerships which have asked people to identify future research questions about a range of different healthcare areas from schizophrenia to endometrial cancer. In November 2017, the JLA hosted a meeting to reflect on the partnerships, identify key issues and to share learning. People shared their experiences to help shape the future of the JLA process and to reflect back on the process to identify the parts that worked well and where there might be room for improvement. Key to all the partnerships is that they have all prominently championed the voices of patients, carers and healthcare professionals to help prioritise research questions that are of importance. The JLA is overseen by the NIHR to support the research priorities identified through the partnerships so that they can feed directly into national funding priorities.

How was it for you? Reflections on involvement

1 Feb

This is the first in a new series which speaks to patients, carers and members of the public who have been involved in the work of the Greater Manchester PSTRC.

Susan Carter was involved in the Multimorbidity Research Advisory Group, which was set up in the 2012-17 Greater Manchester PSTRC to look at the problems faced by patients living with multimorbidity and carers helping to look after people with multimorbidity. You can watch the videos from the group’s first two meetings here.

Why did you become involved?

I was a carer for my husband until his death in 2009. He had multimorbidity problems which I felt were not understood by some medical professionals.

How did the PSTRC benefit from your involvement – what difference do you feel that you made?

I felt I was listened to and the other members of the group understood my concerns. Bringing this to the forefront may avoid other carers suffering like I did.

How did you benefit from your involvement?

I felt I had achieved something and hope that professionals take on board what was said and, in time, will involve carers more in research.

Do you feel that your opportunities for involvement could have been improved in any ways? If so, in what ways?

Not really. It was my first involvement and I enjoyed the opportunity.

Would you recommend becoming involved in research to other members of the public? If so, why?

Yes, I would. I believe research is important and anyone who can spare the time should do it, as it is important that things evolve and improve.

A New Approach to Governance – Non-Executive Lay Members on the Greater Manchester PSTRC Executive Management Board

17 Jan

by Dave Edwards

  • Lay Non-Executive Member of GM PSTRC EMB
  • Lead Governor, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust
  • PPI Participant in Research – UoM Division of Cardiovascular Sciences/Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
  • OUTREACH Trial Steering Committee Member – MAHSC @ The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

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Rationale

For the latest embodiment of the Greater Manchester PSTRC, it was decided to enhance the governance of the Centre by adding a lay dimension to the process. The intention is to broaden the accountability of the Centre by providing a challenging influence at Executive Board level which is not motivated purely by the academic and research aspects of the group, rather by an independent or external view of the workings of the Centre. Assurance on features such as budget, timeline & milestones, adherence to the Centre’s primary brief and purpose and its actual achievements can thus be measured in a more rounded way.

Action

As a result, the position of non-executive lay board member has been created, with the intention of having two such people on the EMB.

Benefits to the Centre

With a lay aspect applied to the governance of the Centre, the following challenges, amongst others, can be more objectively presented during the assurance seeking process at management board meetings:

  • Is the Centre fulfilling its general brief?
  • Is the programme of events going to plan?
  • Do any methods or processes need considering for modification in any way?
  • Are the ongoing activities proving to be appropriately relevant?
  • Are any ‘spin-off’ benefits being realised?
  • Is the Centre performing in accordance with the designated budget?
  • Is the Centre performing such that its reputation will generate further opportunities?

Bearing in mind the above, it seems reasonable to expect the Centre to operate in a more direct and effective way, which will in turn improve the outcome and enhance the experience of not only those participating directly in the research themes but also those managing and supporting the venture.

Benefits to the Lay Non-Executives

As far as the non-executive lay board members are concerned, I see the satisfaction of taking on a challenge, contributing to the success of the Centre and widening one’s experience as providing good enough reason for becoming involved. Moreover, meeting the wide range of people involved in carrying out the role is a bonus to me.

Want to get involved?

4 Jan

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We are looking for a Non-Executive lay member to join the Executive Management Board for the NIHR Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre (Greater Manchester PSTRC).

Could that person be you?

Closing date: Monday 22nd January 2018 at 5pm

Time commitment:  Regular meetings over a 2 year period

We are looking for someone who can :

  • lead and represent the patient/public voice of the Greater Manchester PSTRC by membership of the Executive Management Board and theme/project review meetings
  • represent the Greater Manchester PSTRC to outside bodies as required and provide  a patient/public perspective to the Greater Manchester PSTRC strategic plan.

You will have:

  • An understanding of executive committee processes.
  • An understanding of governance processes at an executive level.
  • An understanding of NHS healthcare structures and issues in Greater Manchester and the UK.
  • Responsibility to ensure that the Greater Manchester PSTRC Executive Management Board is kept appropriately informed of involvement and engagement progress, impact and concerns within the Greater Manchester PSTRC.
  • the skills and knowledge to contribute to a range of involvement and engagement meetings.

Full copy of the role description and person specification.

Appointment for the Non- Exec lay member position will be made by shortlisting and a face-to-face formal interview.

If you have any questions about the role, please contact Dr Sally Giles, PPI Lead by email sally.giles@manchester.ac.uk or phone 0161 306 8020.

If you would like to apply, please fill out the following forms:

  • Application form
  • Equality monitoring form

which can be downloaded in the application pack and return by email to Dr Sally Giles at sally.giles@manchester.ac.uk

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