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Risk Management: developing a learning resource to support pharmacy teams across England

3 May

Risk man guide supported by NIHR GM PSTRC

Good risk management is well recognised as the cornerstone of safe practice in the workplace and risk assessment has long been part of legal requirements for health and safety in UK workplaces.

In 2017, the World Health Organisation highlighted the importance of medication error by choosing the issue of medication-related harm as the focus of its Global Challenge. In response to this, the Medication Safety theme of the Greater Manchester PSTRC worked with CPPE (The Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education) to develop their learning resources on Risk Management.

This was an ideal opportunity for the PSTRC, allowing the team to apply their broad expertise in theoretical risk management concepts to the challenges of the pharmacy context but also enabling them to incorporate the expertise and insights from the PSTRC’s Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative – a group of current in-practice community pharmacists working in the Greater Manchester region (see blog post for more information).

This ensured that the guide would be both theoretically sound in terms of risk management but also enriched with examples that pharmacists saw as pertinent to their day to day work.

Through the co-development of this guide, it was recognised that this could be part of something with much greater impact and, as a result, CPPE dedicated their 2018 learning campaign to be focussed on the topic of Patient Safety, using the guide as a focal point to provide the theoretical background for the campaign.

The guide was distributed to over 67 500 pharmacy professionals as part of CPPE Patient Safety campaign. The PSTRC continued to support CPPE designing appropriate learning activities that would be delivered by CPPE – including face to face “focal point” sessions with over 100 events due to run nationally throughout England and online weekly activities in Feb/Mar 2018 – including an e-challenge quiz and encouraging involvement via Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. This resulted in over 1500 individuals signing up to the campaign activities over the six week period and continuing beyond this with pharmacists still adding their intentions to improve patient safety on CPPE’s ‘Pledge Wall’.

Matthew Shaw, interim director of CPPE, was delighted at the opportunity to collaborate with PSTRC recognising the huge value of building an evidence base into this core learning programme. He commented “It has been a great opportunity to work with PSTRC to link theory with practice and through this to support pharmacy professionals across the country to make their practice safer, and to reduce the risks to people using our services.”

A Patient Safety Toolkit for general practice

15 Mar

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The development and testing of a Patient Safety Toolkit for general practice has taken place over a number of years by a partnership of researchers at the Greater Manchester PSTRC in Nottingham (including Tony Avery, Brian Bell, Sarah Rodgers, Ndeshi Salema, Rachel Spencer) and Manchester (including Stephen Campbell, Kathy Perryman) the NIHR School for Primary Care Research at the Universities of Birmingham, Keele, Oxford and Southampton, as well as the University of Exeter.

The Patient Safety Toolkit is hosted on the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) website. The RCGP is a network of over 52,000 family doctors. The Toolkit is important in preventing patients from being harmed. It is designed to be used by any general practice in the UK and covers the following topics:

  • safe systems
  • safety culture
  • communication
  • patient reported problems
  • diagnostic safety
  • prescribing safety

This range of topics addresses the fact that patient safety is complex and multidimensional. Improving patient safety requires preventing, identifying and addressing issues using practical and actionable information. The collection of tools is hosted on a single platform, which makes it easy to use and enables general practices to identify safety deficits. They can then review and change procedures to improve their patient safety across a key set of patient safety issues.

The research team has published a summary paper, which has been published in the Journal of Patient Safety: A Patient Safety Toolkit for Family Practices

Improving patient safety: linking PSTRC research and expertise to policy and practice

14 Mar

Nav Kapur

Linking up with policy-makers and clinical services is an important part of the work of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC.  Nav Kapur, who is a Professor at the University of Manchester and one of the Research Leads for the Centre, really values the wider engagement he has had with NICE (he chaired the NICE self-harm and depression guidelines), the Department of Health and Social Care,  and Health Education England amongst others.  

Nav says: “We are proud to be a leading centre for research into self-harm and suicide and it’s been a privilege to inform policy and practice.  As an academic, being involved in guideline development allows you to get a wider view of the worldwide literature and its impact on patients.  As a clinician, I like the fact that being involved in guidelines and policies allows you to improve the care of all patients, not just the patient in front of you.”

He continues: “As part of my role as a member of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group for England I contributed to the new suicide prevention strategy, particularly its emphasis on self-harm, as well as contributing to initiatives on confidentiality and responding to new methods of suicide.  My work with Health Education England aims to develop competencies for all NHS staff in the assessment of patients who present with suicidal thoughts or self-harm.” 

Nav also values his role contributing to the induction of new chairs for NICE Guidelines. He explains: “In some ways I find it quite strange that I am now one of the most experienced guideline chairs!  But I really enjoy sharing my experiences of chairing groups and guideline development with people just embarking on the process and I hope they find it helpful too.” 

Nav and colleagues including Roger Webb and Caroline Sanders who lead the Safety in Marginalised Groups theme are looking forward to contributing further to guidelines and policy and practice.  In particular the planned work on the management of self-harm, the safety of mental health services, and improving care for marginalised groups could have a major impact on patient safety and patient care.        

Health economics and patient safety

2 Feb

Health economics is a field of study concerned with the efficient use of resources within the health and social care sector. Efficiency is measured as a combination of patient health outcomes (such as the number of detected cancers, lives saved or quality adjusted life years (QALYs)), with the resource input (costs for treatment etc.).  Health economics not only involves looking at the cost of a healthcare intervention, technology or programme being studied, but also the effectiveness of it. An economic evaluation can be made from different perspectives: that of the health and social care provider (i.e. NHS), the stakeholder, or from a societal perspective, among others. Given the fixed budget the NHS faces, resources should be spent as efficiently as possible.

The more patient safety measures that are used in health and social care, the higher the cost. Therefore, policymakers need guidance on what patient safety interventions to implement to maximise health, care and economic gains. This is not questioning the necessity of patient safety measures themselves, but trying to identify the most efficient use of the existing resources to increase the benefit for patients. Health economics uses different types of evaluations to estimate the effects on the population and the cost to the NHS of the intervention being studied.

Building on success: Safety Informatics

1 Feb

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Digital technologies are becoming more commonplace within the NHS and in our daily lives, producing rich data on all aspects of our health and care. Connecting the data which is held in, for example, smartphones (such as step counters) and our own Electronic Health Records in primary and secondary care, can help us to gain a deep understanding of patient safety issues and the factors that increase risks of harm.

The Safety Informatics theme will continue its work from the first NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC, using the wealth of health data which is collected about us, to help prevent harm in our everyday healthcare experiences. One example of the work taking place in Safety Informatics theme is the ACTION intervention, which uses Electronic Health Record data to give feedback to healthcare professionals in Greater Manchester on prescribing safety and management of long term conditions, which creates a ‘learning health system’. The theme will also work on the surveillance of system-wide diagnostic error; patient-led monitoring of test results; and monitoring late effects of cancer treatment.

Find out more on the Safety Informatics web page.

Self-harm in children and adolescents

1 Feb

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Self-harm is any act of self-poisoning or self-injury whether intentional or not. Self-harm is the strongest risk factor for possible future suicide, with suicide being the second most common cause of death before the age of 25 worldwide.

In recent years, there has been a rise in suicide rates in children and adolescents, as well as a marked increase in psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to identify how the rates of self-harm have changed, and how these changes compare in different genders, as well as among different age groups. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database was used to identify 16,912 records of children or adolescents presenting to their GP after self-harming between 2001 and 2014. Researchers then looked at what proportion had been referred to mental health services and what drugs, if any, were prescribed in the 12 months following the self-harm.

The most notable trends were:

  • A 68% increase in incidence of self-harm in girls aged 13-16
  • Those who lived in socially deprived areas were 23% less likely to be referred in the 12 months following self-harm
  • Children and adolescents who self-harmed were at increased risk:
    • 9 times more likely to die of unnatural causes
    • 17 times more likely to die by suicide
    • 34 times more likely to die through alcohol or drug poisoning.

 Read more in the full paper in BMJ, or the plain English publication summary.

How do I get more involved in my patient safety?

1 Feb

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We have been working together with patients, carers, members of the public, GPs and pharmacists to design a PSTRC patient safety guide for patients and carers. This will be a useful resource to help answer key questions about primary care patient safety and to identify points where patients and carers can make their own care safer.

The guide consists of a short booklet, website and cue card prompts which people can use flexibly:

  • to plan for a consultation
  • as a memory aid
  • to help make the most of the time a person has with a healthcare professional
  • to support their own care at home.

As part of this project, the PSTRC has held co-design events which have brought together members of the public, patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists to discuss how everyone can work together to make care safer. Discussions have focused on key points in the care pathway and actions that each person could identify to improve their patient safety with the priorities that were identified for their own care. These discussions were then used to develop and refine the guide.

Since completing the initial development stage of the patient safety guide, work has been taking place with key national stakeholders to further refine the guide and the centre will continue to co-develop the project and the testing of it with patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

If you’re interested in hearing more about the guide, or to find out more about future co-design events, please contact Rebecca Morris at rebecca.morris@manchester.ac.uk.