Archive | News RSS feed for this section

New Patient Safety Translational Research Centre PhD network

2 Aug

Young man using laptop with female student watching and smiling

by Karen Considine (Centre Manager, NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC), Kelsey Flott (Centre Manager, NIHR Imperial PSTRC) and Beth Fylan (Programme Manager, NIHR Yorkshire and Humber PSTRC)

PhD students linked to the three NIHR Patient Safety Translational Research Centres (PSTRCs) have a new opportunity to register for a PhD student network. The national drive for high quality patient safety research means that the NIHR has now invested in three PSTRCs from 2017-2022. Greater Manchester and Imperial PSTRCs retain their funding and there is now a new third Centre in Yorkshire and Humber. This extension to the PSTRC infrastructure has created opportunities to expand the number of NIHR funded patient safety projects and develop new patient safety research partnerships and networks.

One of these collaborative initiatives is aimed at offering development activities to PhD students by creating a network bringing together PSTRC research students from the three Centres into a dynamic research community. The PSTRC PhD network will encourage students to share information about their research projects and their developing research expertise and then collaborate to develop dissemination plans for their work. The network will be a showcase for the patient safety research projects students are delivering as well as a route to further enhance patient safety research skills by accessing expertise across the PSTRC infrastructure.

Rebecca Lawton, Director of the Yorkshire and Humber PSTRC, said:  “As a new PSTRC we are committed to collaborating with our partners at Manchester and Imperial. We pitched the idea of a PhD network to NIHR and they were extremely supportive. The aim of this network is ensure that the patient safety research leaders of the future have an opportunity to learn from each other and also from the wealth of expertise across the three Centres. I am looking forward to watching the network grow and to learning from the next generation of patient safety researchers ”.

Stephen Campbell, Director of the Greater Manchester PSTRC, said: “Research capacity building is a core and crucial priority for us and all the PSTRCs. The PhD network provides a splendid opportunity for researchers from across the three settings to learn from  each other, research leaders from each site and the importance of collaboration in research”.

Ara Darzi from Imperial PSTRC adds: “Together the three PSTRCs aim to develop evidence based interventions to improve safety across the NHS and health systems abroad. Central to this mission is the training of our students and researchers. This PhD network will provide an opportunity for students across the PSTRCs to collaborate, share insights and create a national network for patient safety research.”

Knowledge sharing tools for inpatient mental health settings

2 Aug

medical doctor with stethoscope. Over blue background

by Natasha Tyler, Research Associate in Safer Care Systems and Transitions theme

It is increasingly recognised that the coordination of care within and between care settings involves the sharing of information, knowledge and know-how between different professionals and service users. The extent of knowledge sharing, shared decision-making and care coordination is shown to influence the quality and safety of patient care.

There is growing interest in promoting better knowledge sharing in mental health services, especially at the care transition points along the care pathway. Care transitions can refer to either those that take place within a hospital environment (i.e. handover from one shift to the next) or when moving from one environment to another (i.e. admission or discharge from/to hospital). However, there has been very little research looking at the effect of interventions that aim to improve knowledge sharing and patient safety at care transition points in mental health.

The current study looks to explore the impact of implementing two co-designed knowledge sharing tools into mental health inpatient wards in one NHS Foundation Trust.  The first will seek to aid the admission process from the community to hospital and the second the nursing handover process from one shift to the next.

The catalysts for this work are numerous adverse safety incidents.  For example, a service user on the older adults mental health ward had a fall, but this information was not communicated to the staff on the next shift. The individual suffered adverse patient safety outcomes; which would not have occurred if his fall was communicated to the next shift. Researchers in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC, based at the University of Nottingham, will work with staff on wards to co-produce a handover tool that ensures essential service user information is communicated effectively, and as a matter of course, between shifts.

The second admissions tool will be co-produced with staff in the same way; however this will look to capture important patient information from external organisations (such as primary care, the police, community teams) before the patient arrives on the ward. It is expected that this will reduce safety incidents, as important knowledge will be shared before the patient is admitted, allowing staff to better understand the patient’s history. It is expected that implementing the tool will have implications across the care pathway, as the tool will capture information about factors such as housing, past readmissions etc. which will also be necessary for reducing negative patient safety outcomes at discharge.

For more information on this project, you can contact Natasha Tyler via email at natasha.tyler@nottingham.ac.uk.

NHS 70: celebrating pharmacy and looking to the future

2 Aug
NHS 70 Pharmacy event group photo_small

Members and organisers of the Pharmacy Collaborative l-r: James Hind, Edward Teggart, Melinda Lyons, Lauren Worrall

by Lauren Worrall and Melinda Lyons

This year, to celebrate 70 years of the NHS, the Local Professional Network for Pharmacy in Greater Manchester held a conference to recognise how pharmacy professionals had contributed to the NHS and looking forward to how pharmacists expect their role to change to serve the needs of the NHS in the future. The conference involved exploring current issues impacting on pharmacy practice. As part of this, the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative gave a workshop in Manchester on their continuing research into improving patient safety.

Co-chaired by Lauren Worrall and Melinda Lyons from the PSTRC, previous translational research was presented demonstrating how some techniques used in high hazard industries could be applied to pharmacy practice.  These included looking at errors, as well as trying to manage distractions and interruptions. There was also insight from the pharmacy collaborative members on how involvement in the research has influenced their practice and provided them with new approaches to improve patient safety in their pharmacy teams.  Collaborative member Edward Teggart presented his approach to managing error risk in practice and James Hind presented his award winning work on managing distractions.

To get the audience of pharmacists really engaged and learn about risk management decision making, the delegates took part in a team game where their risk management decisions could result in them maintaining lucrative service contracts or going bankrupt in the blink of an eye!

The workshop concluded with a question and answer session which led to a lively discussion about safety in practice. The delegates shared the issues that impact upon their work on a day-to-day basis.  In the relatively unexplored area of risk management research in community pharmacy, questions were posed about the potential avenues and future direction of their research. Whilst everyone agreed that patient safety is critical to their practice, there was also agreement that it is often difficult to share good ideas and learning. The concept of the community pharmacy collaborative was something that all agreed enhanced patient safety and could be used in other geographical areas.

Helping parents of children with respiratory tract infections decide when to consult primary care

19 Jun

Mother taking care of her sick child

by Stephen Campbell, Director of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC

Primary care is under extreme pressure and struggling to cope with demand for care. Children with Respiratory Tract Infections (RTI) are the most common reason for parents contacting primary care internationally. Parents and patients are offered little, if any, advice on if, when or how to use primary care services. Methods to improve the appropriateness of seeking help could assist primary care to deliver an improved service to the patients in most need. There is considerable parental uncertainty regarding if and when to consult a general practice healthcare professional when children fall ill with RTIs and RTI consultation rates vary widely between GP practices. Safer, cost-effective and more practical interventions are needed urgently to help parents make better use of scarce resources. This requires clear, relevant and unambiguous advice. Valid and reliable criteria are needed to support parents when they are deciding whether (and when) to consult when their child has a (suspected) RTI.

Funded by the NIHR School for Primary Care Research, researchers from the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC (Stephen Campbell, Rebecca Morris) and the Universities of Bristol (Alastair Hay) and Oxford (Gail Hayward) will see if professional consensus can be reached on the signs and symptoms that should be used by parents / guardians when deciding if and when to consult, both during the day and out of hours. It will use the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to develop symptom scenarios and appropriateness criteria.  These will enable us to work with patients / members of the public and health professionals to develop a practical guide to support parents in deciding whether they need to contact clinical services for their child. A study working group will oversee the study involving representation from relevant health professions and including PPI/parental representation as an integral part of the research. Co-design events with parents, patients, GPs and pharmacists will then be used to develop the practical guide for parents as well as to develop the support tool for using the guide.

The guide for parents will inform the design of future interventions that could (once proven safe and effective) be implemented by GP practices and other NHS primary care providers (such as NHS 111), e.g. via general practice and NHS websites.

ReVerse: creative conversations between mental health service users and staff

6 Jun

Words_ReVerse illustration_cropped

by Bella Starling

Mental health service users, carers and staff have much in common these days coping with stress and distress, especially at a time of huge pressure on services.

ReVerse workshops aim to equalise the space between mental health service users and staff, to creatively nurture insight, dialogue and healing relationships about patient safety in mental health services and research.

We think a good way to do this is through poetry and spoken word. Creative formats can provide a different angle and unique insight into ourselves, others and our collective wellbeing, and provide those who often feel they are not heard with an opportunity to express their voices. Exploring metaphor and meaning can offer new dimensions to personal and professional health and research relationships.

The workshops are open to mental health service users, carers and staff (including clinical, research, managerial, administrative and support staff). We aim to have an equal mix of staff and service users. ReVerse workshops will include:

  • Examples and readings of poetry and/or spoken word, drawing from different experiences of mental health 
  • Discussions and reflections
  • Having a go: producing your own poetry or prose.

The ReVerse initiative is a collaboration between David Gilbert (poet, Patient Director and mental health service user) and Bella Starling (Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow, Director of Public Programmes Team, Manchester University NHS Trust) and the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC.

For more information behind the workshops, see David’s recent blog post.

Our first workshop takes place in Ziferblat Media City on Tuesday 3 July, register your interest on our Eventbrite page. Registration is free, but requires a commitment to attend.

These workshops are pilots as part of an exciting new initiative. Those involved will help to shape the future development of this ReVerse Programme.

NHS70 Excellence in Primary Care Award for Nottingham’s Medicine Safety Research Group

22 May

Print

by Carly Rolfe, NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC

The Medicine Safety Research Group at The University of Nottingham is the regional winner of the Excellence in Primary Care Award category of the NHS70 Parliamentary Awards and is shortlisted for the national award.

The research group was nominated by the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EM AHSN), who highlighted a number of developments which are already improving, and will continue to improve, prescribing safety in primary care. These include:

  1. Improving the safety of medicines prescribing through the design and testing of an intervention called PINCER.
  2. Development of ‘prescribing safety indicators’ which are now used in GP computer software to avoid prescribing errors
  3. Identifying the frequency, nature and causes of prescribing errors in general practice, leading to:
  4. Developed a Patient Safety Toolkit for GPs, which is available on the RCGP website and has been accessed over 10,000 times.

The Medication Safety theme of the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC has worked closely with the award-winning Nottingham-based research team on many of the developments. A number of these projects and interventions will be developed further over the coming years, through a continued collaboration between the Greater Manchester PSTRC and the University of Nottingham.