The Foundations Framework for Developing and Reporting New Models of Care for Multimorbidity

15 Nov

by Jonathan Stokes, Research Associate in the Manchester Centre for Health Economics

J Stokes_Foundations Framework diagram

With colleagues at the Universities of Bristol, Glasgow and Dundee, we have published a framework aimed at improving care for patients with multimorbidity (two or more long-term conditions).

Long-term conditions and multimorbidity are a global health priority. Patients with multimorbidity receive more fragmented care and have worse health outcomes, and health systems struggle to address their needs. We need new ways of delivering care to address this.

To date, there has been limited success at delivering care that improves outcomes for these patients. One major problem is that there is no agreement on how to describe care for patients with multimorbidity. This makes it difficult for researchers to talk about their work, and to explain these new ways of delivering care to patients and policy makers. Our framework offers a starting point for addressing this issue.

Our framework describes care for multimorbidity in terms of the foundations:

  •  the theory on which it is based
  • ·         the target population (‘multimorbidity’ is a vague term, so we need to define the group carefully, e.g. a patient with diabetes and hypertension might have very different care needs than a patient with dementia and depression)
  • the elements of care implemented to deliver the model.

We categorised 3 elements of care: (1) the clinical focus (e.g. a focus on mental health), (2) how care was organised (e.g. offering extended appointment times for those who have multimorbidity), and (3) what was needed to support care (e.g. changing the IT system to better share electronic records between primary and secondary care).

We used our framework to look at current approaches to care for multimorbid patients. We found:

  • Care for multimorbidity is mostly based on the well-known Chronic Care Model (CCM). This was designed for people with single diseases, and may not be fit for purpose for patients with multimorbidity.
  • Much care is focussed on elderly or high-risk patients, although there are actually more people aged under 65 with multimorbidity. We need to make sure that models don’t neglect the needs of younger patients, or those who are at lower risk, who might have most to gain in preventing future health problems.
  • We need to look more at the needs of low-income populations (where multimorbidity is known to be more common), and those with mental health problems (multimorbid patients with a mental health issue are at increased risk for worse health outcomes).
  • There is an emphasis on self-management, but patients with multimorbidity frequently have barriers to self-managing their diseases.
  • The emphasis on case management (intensive individual management of high-risk patients) should take into account the evidence that while patient satisfaction can be improved, cost and self-assessed health are not significantly affected.

Health systems have only recently begun to implement new models of care for multimorbidity, with limited evidence of success. Careful design and reporting can help develop evidence more rapidly in this important area. We hope our framework can encourage better research which is urgently needed to improve care for those who use it most.

This free to read article can be found at the following link: http://www.annfammed.org/content/15/6/570.full

Stokes J, Man M-S, Guthrie B, Mercer SW, Salisbury C, Bower P. The Foundations Framework for Developing and Reporting New Models of Care for Multimorbidity. The Annals of Family Medicine. 2017;15(6):570-7.

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