Archive | October, 2017

Learning from each other: the International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) Conference 2017

24 Oct

by Rebecca Morris, Research Fellow in the Safety in Marginalised Groups theme

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The International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) conference was held this year at the QEII conference centre in London next to Westminster Abbey and Palace of Westminster which was a prestigious backdrop to an interesting and diverse range of presentations.  This year’s conference focused on learning at the system level to improve healthcare quality and safety and was supported by the Health Foundation. It was great to see that the conference was awarded the Patients Included status which reflected the conference’s focus on incorporating the experience of patients whilst ensuring that they are not excluded or exploited. This was evident within presentations that I attended that included patients speaking alongside researchers and clinicians and I felt this was a welcome development from last year’s conference. Sharing and valuing different experiences and expertise is an important recognition of different types of expertise that need to be involved, particularly when we are looking at healthcare quality and safety.

There was a fantastic array of workshops, plenaries, oral and poster presentations. I wanted to be in more of the streams than I could attend in one day! I had both a 15 minute oral presentation and a poster presentation to discuss two of the projects in the NIHR Greater Manchester PSTRC. My oral presentation was part of the Quality in the community theme and it was great to hear about different community approaches to quality and safety across the world. I presented the James Lind Alliance Primary Care Patient Safety Priority Setting Partnership and the top 10 priorities for future research. This is important in shaping the direction of future work which prioritises the questions which patients, carers and healthcare professionals need answering. Also in-keeping with the theme of incorporating the experience of patients and turning that into action, I presented a poster on the co-development of the patient safety guide for primary care where we have co-produced the guide package with patients, carers, GPs and pharmacists. The poster was a great opportunity to discuss the patient safety guide, co-production and networking with people from a range of places, from Canada to India, about the work and sharing ideas and building links.

After last year’s conference where there was a limited discussion of primary care and the community, it was great that there were so many of us there to represent the work that we’ve been doing working with patients, carers and clinicians. Fellow Greater Manchester PSTRC researchers, Caroline Sanders and Sudeh-Cheraghi Sohi, were part of workshops discussing the use of patient experience data and diagnostic safety respectively, along with posters from Penny Lewis and Christian Thomas exploring safety in community pharmacy.

To finish off an interesting day I was invited to a Health Foundation reception at Westminster Abbey to carry on the conversations and it was great to meet and discuss how our work can lead to improvement in the system and experiences of people who use and deliver healthcare services. A great way to end the day and I’m looking forward to how we can build on this over the next year.

Patient Safety in Community Pharmacy: the importance of teamwork

19 Oct

by Tomasz Niebudek, Pharmacist

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My name is Tomasz Niebudek. I work as a community pharmacist in the Salford area. Last year at the end of May our Superintendent Pharmacist forwarded to me an e-mail asking if anybody would be interested in taking part in a project at The University of Manchester. In a nutshell, the aim of the project was to improve safety in community pharmacy. I expressed my interest in participating, thinking that this would be an interesting challenge, that would allow me to reflect on and improve safety in my pharmacy and across the whole company.

One of the key things that I learnt by joining the collaborative is that we should look, not only at reactive ways of analysing errors, but also use proactive methods  to prevent errors from occurring before they’ve happened. The tool that, in my opinion, had the biggest impact on my practice was PRIMO (Proactive Risk Monitoring for Organisational Learning). This was basically a questionnaire given to all staff members in my team to find out what affects their ability to dispense accurately. This led to many interesting observations and reflections. It was encouraging to see that staff members who are usually quiet during the staff meetings had very strong views on certain matters. Some team members identified a problem and were able to provide a solution to it almost immediately. It was so motivating to see that they care about safety and it was also interesting to discover that my staff members have observed issues that I have never picked up on. I have very carefully analysed all the data from those questionnaires and shared my conclusions with my whole team during a staff meeting. We have straight away implemented changes to our practice. As you all know, change within organisations can be met with resistance by staff. However, the fact that the ideas were generated by the staff themselves made a huge difference (a positive one, of course). Doing that questionnaire made me realise that staff need to be fully onboard when safety is being considered.

I now encourage all staff in my branch to report near misses and dispensing errors, as previously, this was a task only/usually undertaken by myself. We work together to think of ideas to improve practice and safety in the pharmacy. Initially, I was worried that some staff might have the attitude that “this is not my problem”, which is an approach that I think is partially to blame for errors in primary care. However, I’ve learned that if you respect your team for the valuable input they can have in improving practice, and work with them to achieve this aim, it pays back.

Big thanks to The University of Manchester researchers in helping us to look at safety from a different perspective.

The purpose of the Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Collaborative is to work as a group exchanging ideas and sharing experiences. The same approach must be used on an individual pharmacy level- pharmacists can only improve the safety of their patients with his or her team on board.