Keep taking the tablets: part one

11 Apr

by Max Scott

Part six of the blog series “The desperate fight to be heard, and supported, when living with the invisible struggles of Multimorbidity”

Introduction to the blog series is here

MaxScottMedsBox_photo_blogApr16

Regular (daily) medications:

VENTOLIN EVOHALER 10 micrograms (µg) as needed

SYMBICORT TURBOHALER 200µg, two puff morning and night

LEVOTHYROXINE TABLETS 50 µg, one every morning

LEVOTHYROXINE TABLETS 25µg, one every morning

OMEPRAZOLE TABLETS 20 milligrams (mg), one morning and night

TESTOSTERONE GEL 50 mg, one sachet each morning

FLUOXETINE 40mg, by way of two 20mg tablets every morning

PRAVASTATIN TABLETS, 20mg, one every night

GENOTROPHIN GROWTH HORMONE INJECTIONS, 5.3mg, one every night

PREGABALIN CAPSULES 300mg, one at night (for sleep disorders)

PREGABALIN CAPSULES 150mg, one in the morning (for meralgia paresthetica and back pain)

CLONAZEPAM TABLETS, 0.5mg, progressing to 1mg tablet and to be gradually raised to 2mg, at night

FOLIC ACID TABLETS 5mg, one at night


Other (sometimes taken) medicines:

MICOLETTE MICRO-ENEMAS, approx once a week

PARACETAMOL TABLETS 500mg, one-two when needed

CO CODAMOL TABLETS 8/500mg, one-two when needed

CODEINE TABLETS 30mg, one-two when needed

TRAMADOL TABLETS 50mg, rarely

DIAZEPAM TABLETS 5mg, when needed

ANUSOL SUPPOSITORIES, when needed (for haemorrhoids)

Various creams, intermittently, not regularly


So far in this series, I have concentrated on the many experiences and difficulties of living with multimorbidity, and somehow making sure that you are listened to, believed, and respected by medical professionals. By the very nature of the condition, professionals will be faced with a patient who is complex and will, more than likely, have conditions which are invisible to the eye, making trust that much more important.  I will continue on this theme in the future, but for this article I am going to focus more on an inevitable price to pay for having multimorbidity – and that is having to take multiple medications.

I am presently on thirteen regular daily medications for my varied health issues, and I have to take several more intermittently when the need arises. Let me explain some of the problems this can cause. Firstly, for me, the patient. Then (in part two) with the GPs and Consultants.

The Patient

The first of my present medications I ever took were my asthma inhalers, and I have been on these for longer than I can remember. Taking them became a way of life many years ago. Later, gastritis led to me taking Omeprazole. These were joined by the odd Diazepam here and there for anxiety, and sometimes I needed to use a nasal spray for rhinitis. All fairly straightforward at this stage. Then came my Pituitary surgery in 2005. Along with my life in general, that is when taking medications became more complex. I have included a list of my medications above but, to clarify, the ones I take as a result of my tumour removal/hypopituitarism are Levothyroxine 50 and 25 mg, Testosterone gel, and nightly injections of Genotrophin Growth Hormone. Hydrocortisone tablets have been needed on occasion, but this remains an ambiguity of extreme curiousness, which I shall raise again later in this blog. Such things as foot operations; pain from trapped nerves, osteoarthritis, slipped discs etc; and complex sleep disorders have all added to the list.

It’s not just about the amount of medications that I am now on, but the amount of tablets I have to take, when, and how. Remember, anyone who has seen any of my other blogs on here, I have short term memory loss, plus cognitive and executive disorders, which make it all the more easy to make mistakes. I have had to get various “Daily Pill Boxes”, example photo also included here, which should give you an idea of the sheer amount.

I mentioned a moment ago about making mistakes. Well, the drug companies do not make things any easier by manufacturing capsule shells, containing different medications, that look so similar. For example, two of my medications – one for my gastritis, the other an anticonvulsant medication also used for pain and sleep disorders – are both contained in a small, totally white capsule. How ridiculous, and potentially hazardous, is this?  This may be one thing when still in their original boxes (which, incidentally, chop and change their designs and colours so that you never build up a familiarity with them, often seemingly copying the packaging of other drug brands) but when separated into my “daily pill box” can become a nightmare…I have to put my strongest reading glasses on, to find some tiny dark lettering on one of them, and that is the only way I can tell these two, radically different, medications apart. So, basically, I am now on so many medications that just taking the tablets, at the right time, and making sure they are the right ones, has become an art-form all unto itself!

A final point in this part one, and it is a very strange one. One medication that I have not had to take following the Pituitary surgery has been Hydrocortisone, needed when there is a deficiency of ACHC, the hormone that stimulates the production of hydrocortisone by the Adrenal Gland. This hormone often does need to be replaced with patients who have had Pituitary surgery, and, as so much of the after-effects of my Pituitary surgery has been severe, life-changing chronic fatigue, it would have been logical to expect me to be deficient in this. But not so. That is until recently, when I had a series of blood samples taken later in the day than usual: after mid-day, when I am really beginning to flounder as my body and mind wind down towards my afternoon sleep.  THIS time, my hydrocortisone level was found to be very low, and an emergency phone call came that I must start taking hydrocortisone tablets IMMEDIATELY. Ahh, an answer to a problem, I thought. But no. A couple of weeks later, I had another series of tests, which astonishingly showed that I do NOT need to take Hydrocortisone after all. The last test was taken earlier in the morning than the other one. Relevant? Well, all I can say is that there are times like this when I begin to feel like a human guinea-pig!

2 Responses to “Keep taking the tablets: part one”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. The desperate fight to be heard, and supported, when living with the invisible struggles of Multimorbidity | GM PSTRC - April 11, 2016

    […] click here to read part six of Max’s story […]

  2. Read my notes…please? | GM PSTRC - September 20, 2016

    […] my last blog, called “Keep taking the tablets: part one”, I tried to explain some of the difficulties I have faced in having to take multiple […]

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